Webinar: The Care We All Strive For: The Impact of Interoperability

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Has 2020 given you webinar fatigue? The seemingly endless run of virtual events and webinars would certainly justify it. And while moving everything to the digital world has its challenges, society is embracing technology and making the most of the situation. Healthcare is no exception. With the expanded use of technology, healthcare has been reminded of the importance of being able to communicate with each other quickly, efficiently, and easily.

In our October Webinar Series event, The Care We All Strive For: The Impact of Interoperability, we will help fight that webinar fatigue by taking a break from the traditional webinar structure and take time to revisit our shared purpose – to make healthcare run better for everyone.

Please join us on Wednesday, October 28th at 11:00 am PT / 2:00 pm ET to hear the story of what it feels like to be a patient, provider, pharmacist, and payer in a world where interoperability is a reality.

Our sponsor Surescripts will be joined by four healthcare stakeholders who will share their take on the difference interoperability makes on the experience of a patient, provider, pharmacist, and payer. The panelists will examine how sharing information across stakeholders can reduce administrative burden and improve member experience.*:

Carlos GarciaDr. Natalie PinterKeisha Wright, RPhOscar Gustafsson
Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis & HypertensionProviderPharmacist, Specialty PharmacyVice President of Pharmacy, Payer

Over the next four weeks leading up to the live webinar on October 28th, we’ll be sharing more information on how patients, providers, pharmacists, and payers all benefit from enhanced interoperability of data and systems. In the meantime, learn more about how Surescripts addresses healthcare interoperability challenges here.

* These are imaginary personas whose role in this webinar will be performed by employees of our sponsor Surescripts.

Physician Perspectives on COVID-19 Impact to Fall Season (Part 2)

By | COVID19, HCEG Content, Resources | One Comment

Late last month, the HealthCare Executive Group hosted an informal discussion with three physician executives on their observations, experiences, and insight about how COVID-19 has impacted healthcare and healthcare stakeholders. The theme of the discussion was: “What’s changed, what’s remained the same, and what can we expect in the coming fall season?”

HCEG board member Dr. David Diloreto, MD, a board-certified ophthalmologist, ophthalmic plastic surgeon, a principal at Vizient/Sg2 and prior senior vice-president at GE Healthcare Camden was joined by:

Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, MD, Senior Medical Director in Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health Plan and a practicing pediatrician at Hamilton Health Center, an FQHC in Harrisburg, PA and Dr. Jason Woo, MD a practicing board-certified obstetrician/gynecologist, a veteran with 31 years in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service and a consultant at the Arbinger Institute.

HCEG’s Executive Director Ferris Taylor helped to facilitate the discussion and provided an HCEG perspective.

This is the second post of a three-part series sharing highlights of that conversation. See the first part here and consider subscribing to our newsletter to receive the final post and other information of value to healthcare leaders and change-makers.

Topics Discussed in Part 1

The trio of physician executives discussed the following topics in the first post of this series:

  • Impact Factors Affecting Utilization of Services
  • Balancing Treatment to Avoid Ongoing Destruction of Demand for Non-COVID Services
  • Returning to School & Addressing Disadvantaged Populations
  • A Pediatric Physician on Sending Kids – Including Her Own – Back to School
  • Impacts on Minorities & Underserved Populations
  • Uncertainty in Testing and Understanding Prevalence
  • How Long Will We Be Dealing with COVID-19?

Look for the final post next week and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter for more information of potential value to healthcare leaders and change-makers.

Listen to the entire recording here

Live, Interactive Follow-On Chat and Q&A – October 13th

For more detailed information on the topics presented in this series of posts and for a chance to interact with and ask questions of these physician leaders, join us on October 13, 2020 at 11:00am PT/2:00 pm ET for a live, interactive follow-on chat. The physician panelists will provide additional insight on what’s changed, what’s remained, and what can be expected for the coming fall and winter season under COVID-19.

Questions and requests for additional information shared by registrants prior to and/or during the live chat will be fielded by the panelists. Reserve your seat and submit your questions and comments today!Be sure to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn more about what’s presented in this post – and please share it with your associates.

COVID-19 Vaccines & Fall Flu Shots

A significant part of the discussion continued on the development of a COVID vaccine and the importance of getting a seasonal flu shot to avoid undue burden to services and potential mis-diagnoses of the seasonal flu as COVID-19. Dr. Johanna shared:

Importance of Flu Shots – Minimize Avoidable Impacts

“We saw a decline of seasonal viruses during the spring and early beginning of the summer. I think right now you have to think about the monumental impact of children returning to school even if it’s for two days. Our children (Dr. Johanna’s children) have been with us since March 13th at 4 p.m. when the school released them and said ‘They’re not coming back. We don’t know when.’

 And so our children haven’t really been exposed to a lot of other people, so we do know that children are going to be exposed not only to COVID-19 but all the other normal viruses that we see; or bacteria like strep throat. I think one of the important messages that I’ve been sharing with my family since day one is the importance of the flu vaccine. And there is a lot of misinformation and misunderstanding about the flu vaccine. People still believe that you get sick from the flu vaccine. That you are going to develop the flu from the flu vaccine. A lot of families, almost not even 50 % of the population in the United States, do not get the flu vaccine every year. “

Is Herd Immunity a Potential Solution?

Dr. Johanna continued:Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic - Maintain Immunizations Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key

“And so if we want to have a good herd immunity, it is important and I explained to the parents, that providing the flu vaccine to your child and your family is a way to combat a coronavirus. And they look at me like ‘Why? It’s a different virus.’

 And I said: ‘because when your child gets sick with the flu, because you didn’t want to get the flu shot, we are going to have a very hard time differentiating between COVID-19 or the flu. So we have to test your child for both viruses and then there’s going to create a level of anxiety regarding school, quarantine and care that your child is going to need because we don’t know if it’s the flu.’”

Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic – Maintain Immunizations

“Now you can get the flu after getting the flu vaccine but you’re going to be protected from some of the major complications that we see when you have a natural illness and the duration of the illness is much shorter instead of being two to three weeks with the natural illness, it may be two to three days.

 So I explained to the parents the importance of getting all the children’s immunizations on time. And believe it or not, there’s a critical important piece of information I need families to understand: Even though throughout most of COVID-19 pediatricians are open and family doctors are seeing children too, the importance of the well-child visit to be up-to-date and your teenagers, and the shots is critical – because we don’t want to change this pandemic for a measles epidemic or whooping cough so we have vaccines to prevent illnesses so let’s use them, let’s get them.”Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic - Maintain Immunizations Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key

Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key

Dr. Jason shared the importance of reaching out to underserved populations is a trustful manner:

“I think there’s a communication point that has to be addressed- particularly for the underprivileged populations – is that getting vaccinations has to come from people who sound and look like them. It cannot come from the systems. And that’s where engaging your community outreach folks is going to be so critical to be able to get those. And it may not be having them coming to the hospital. It may be having the local pharmacy or having folks who are able to engage them there.

 Because just as you point out Johanna, there’s so much mistrust and particularly folks are just when you can put the message through a medium that they’re more comfortable with that’s just going to be that’s so critical to address some of the social determinants that inhibit a lot of our understanding.”

Dr. David added:

“And that’s encouraging because it’s going to be needed coming forward. CVS for instance has 1800 testing sites right now around the United States that they’re expanding and they’re in negotiations to become vaccination centers. So just to your point that the neighborhood drug store being actually now a health hub where you can get vaccinated.”

The Change to Telehealth

One of the clear changes instigated by the coronavirus pandemic is the rapid adoption of telehealth. Stay-at-home and physical-distancing directives forced providers to rapidly adopt telehealth services or expand existing telehealth capabilities. Long hampered by reimbursement and physician adoption challenges, telehealth use exploded at the end of the 1st quarter of 2022 and has now become table-stakes.

Ferris prompted the panelists to share their take on telehealth and Dr. Johanna began:

Physicians Warming to Telehealth

“So I definitely also want to emphasize the importance of innovation and technology. I would talk to peers six months ago if somebody was telling me that I was going to do a tele-visit. I would have left. I was like: ‘I cannot see a pediatric patient by computer or phone.’

And now is I love it. And definitely it has pushed innovation into healthcare. It was slowly happening but to go from March to April and to see the dramatic jump into utilization of telemedicine is really important because it’s being used as a tool to connect with families; to engage patients; to continue allowing providers and physicians to continue providing the services that they (patients) need, and that is part of value-based care.”

Dr. Johanna urged physicians to answer the question:

Physicians Warming to Telehealth Telehealth - New Opportunities for Providers to Connect with Patients

“How can you think outside of the box in order to reach the population that is yours in order to prove it provides the best outcome for your patients?

And offered a reminder:

“And so the traditional model is one-to-one, in the office, with the physician. And we’re moving away from that model to having health care done in the home environment, remote monitoring, telemedicine, community health workers, other alternative sites of care – in order to complement what we call traditional medicine.”

Telehealth – New Opportunities for Providers to Connect with Patients

Dr. Jason on opportunities for telehealth: elective vs. non-elective procedures

“I think there are two different populations of providers that we need to think about:

1. Elective Procedures – Non-Emergent

Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic - Maintain Immunizations Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key

“One is the folks who perform more of the elective stuff who are not the frontline workers now. In the sense that David was talking about, the folks who traditionally may have been doing elective surgeries or other sub-specialty care where there is an opportunity to transform the way they’re delivering care. In a way, I think that’s going to be more effective because of the opportunity to accept a lot of the modalities that telehealth has pushed forward.

I’ve been trying to do telehealth 20 years ago. I was trying to push telehealth in. I saw the radiologists, the mental health, and the psychiatrist, they loved it because there’s just so much more opportunity available to them when they’re not one-on-one in a fixed location anymore. And for those folks, I think there’s an opportunity to get back to actually better outcomes; to connect with your patients in a way that you hadn’t before.

It’s kind of like Zoom. We do a lot of training and I love the chat feature because there’s this ability to interact with folks that I hadn’t thought of before. And when you’re open to that I think that, in a lot of ways, it’s going to be very healthy for healthcare providers to be able to connect to the patients.”

RELATED: Should You Go to the Doctor’s Office During Covid-19?

2. Non-Elective Procedures – Emergent

“I think on the other side though is those frontline providers that are still stuck with trying to take care of the folks that are coming through the ER or into their ICU’S; where there’s still not a lot of good information. And the struggle that they’re going to go through of trying to do the best that they can with all the uncertainty and the limitations that we have.

I think for those folks we have to be really mindful that there’s a great burden that our traditional thought about what the role of the provider is that we as a physician, I think, we have to help (our patients) see beyond and get into ‘What’s the best that you can do?’”

Healthcare Supply-Chain – Rethinking COVID-19 Impacts

The ready availability of PPE, medical equipment like ventilators, and certain pharmaceuticals was clearly called into question by the coronavirus pandemic. The lack of a $3.00 mask hampered providers’ ability to serve patients. And $30,000 ventilators are not just easily stocked without serious consideration.

Availability of Personal Protective Equipment – A Matter of Trust

Dr. Johanna shared her personal perspective from previous pandemics:

“I remember H1N1 and it was not like this. There is an element of trust as a provider, and also as a person working in the United States, that I should have not had to worry about where is my PPE coming from. It never crossed my mind in 2009 that I would not have enough PPE to protect myself against H1N1.

 And if you recall, pregnant women were high risk for H1N1. And I was pregnant, caring for pediatric patients, with my second child and I never had to think about it twice. And so now, it’s the anxiety that providers have to know that they’re having the correct equipment in order to provide the care.

 And also knowing so many of our peers are impacted by this disease and have died. It’s something that you need to pause and think about: What are we doing?”

Physician’s New Understanding & Appreciation for Supply Chains

Dr. David on physicians and their supply-chain relationship:

“The other interesting difference is that most physicians in December of last year (2019) probably couldn’t really describe a supply chain and certainly couldn’t talk to you about the strategic value of a supply chain.

 Well, after they went through the PPE shortages and pharmacy shortages, they’re now really interested in working with their healthcare stakeholders and hospital stakeholders on how to optimize supply chain activities.

 And so there’s a lot of work around nationalizing and onshoring. One of the shortages in the supply chain is the fact that countries nationalize these products, they’re not coming to North America. We’re having to work through that and that’s a big change. So with respect to payment models, we’re already seeing employers – remember there’s going to be some significant economic issues for companies/employers who are not interested in or thinking about value-based care.”

RELATED: With Excess National Supply, Exchanges Will Allow U.S. Hospitals to Continue Meeting Ventilator Demand

Part 3 Coming Soon – More COVID-19 Insight from Physician Executives

In the final post of this three-part series, highlights and details on the following topics from the informal discussion with Dr. Diloreto, Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, and Dr. Jason Woo will be shared:

  • Lessons Learned and Lessons to Be Learned
  • Experiences from Southern Hemisphere – Seasonal Viruses at All-Time Lows
  • Value of Encouraging Use of Masks
  • ‘Long Haulers’ – The Unknown, Long-Term Impact of COVID-19
  • Financial Impact on Providers, Employer Groups, & Payers
  • Employers Forced into New Reimbursement Models
  • Delayed Demand for Non-COVID Services

Live, Interactive Follow-On Chat and Q & A – October 13th

For more detailed information on the topics raised in this series of posts and for a chance to interact with and ask questions of these physician executives, join us on October 13, 2020, at 11:00 am PT/2:00 pm ET for a live, interactive follow-on chat and Q & A opportunity.

The physician panelists will provide additional insight into what’s changed, what’s remained the same, and what may be expected this fall and going into 2021. Questions and requests for additional information shared by registrants prior to and/or during the live chat will be fielded by the panelists.

Reserve your seat and submit your questions and comments today!Be sure to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn more about what’s presented in this post – and please share it with your associates. And if you are not a subscriber to our newsletter, consider joining 5000+ other healthcare leaders, change-makers, and industry participants and subscribe today!

HCEG HealthCare Executive Group 2021 Top 10Step-1-Selection-Feature-1.jpg

Healthcare Challenges, Issues, & Opportunities – The 2021 HCEG Top 10

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The HCEG Top 10 list of challenges, issues, and opportunities facing healthcare leaders have been a focus of the HealthCare Executive Group for over a decade. Planned for development by participants at our 2020 Annual Forum, the 2021 HCEG Top 10 list of challenges, issues, and opportunities facing healthcare executives guides our content and programming throughout the coming year. It also serves as the basis for the Industry Pulse research that HCEG and our sponsor partner Change Healthcare have provided over the last decade.

Given the sea change forced by the coronavirus pandemic, the upcoming presidential elections, not hosting our in-person Annual Forum this year, and feedback received about providing more detailed information – a new approach will be used to develop the HCEG Top 10 list for 2021. Four main objectives guide the development of the 2021 HCEG Top 10 list:

Address Impacts from Coronavirus Pandemic & Upcoming Elections

The COVID-19 crisis has clearly altered healthcare priorities and the outcome of the November elections will most certainly do the same. It’s important for the 2021 HCEG Top 10 list to reflect these changed priorities and likely impact from election results.

Deeper Dive into Topics of Interest to Healthcare Executives

In an effort to provide more detailed input and insight into the challenges, issues, and opportunities facing all healthcare stakeholders, candidates for the 2021 HCEG Top 10 list include over 40 ‘sub-topics’ grouped into thirteen ‘themes.” These additional details are expected to provide more value based on the type of healthcare stakeholder: health plan/payer, provider, and risk-bearing provider.

All Virtual Identification, Selection & Ranking Process

Given the absence of our in-person 2020 Annual Forum that was scheduled for this month – and keeping with HCEG’s goal of providing more granular information – the process for identifying, selecting, and ranking core items on the HCEG Top 10 will take place virtually this year.

Open to All Healthcare Industry Participants

Historically, HCEG’s Top 10 process has been limited to HCEG members and attendees of our Annual Forum. Since HCEG is not hosting a physical annual forum this year, and in an effort to collect a wider perspective from a greater number of healthcare industry participants, we’re opening the 2021 HCEG Top 10 process to everyone who cares to participate.

Overview of 2021 HCEG Top 10 Development Process

The following is the high-level process for developing the new HCEG Top 10 list:

  1. Identify “Initial List of 2021 HCEG Top 10 Themes & Sub-Topics” (COMPLETED)
  2. Solicit Feedback on Initial List from Industry at Large (9/16/20 through 11/4/20)
  3. Collect rankings of the Top 10 Sub-Topics identified in Step #2 (11/15/20 through 11/30/20)
  4. Announce 2021 HCEG Top 10 List (12/14/20)

Help Select Candidates for the 2021 HCEG Top 10

The following are the major thematic categories proposed for the 2021 HCEG Top 10. A list of the sub-topics associated with each theme can be found here.
Take Step 1 of the 2-Step 2021 HCEG Top 10 development process today.  This survey should take less than 5 minutes to complete.  If you are unable to complete the entire survey, we urge you to complete as many of the sections as possible that you consider important.

Thank you in advance for sharing your insight. Please contact us at [email protected] if you have any questions or comments. And join our newsletter to receive information, ideas, and insight for healthcare executives and change-makers: bit.ly/hcegnewsltr

Recapping: Towards Next-Generation Care: The Digital Musculoskeletal (MSK) Clinic

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Currently, people with back and joint pain experience a fragmented approach to care. Whether it’s an acute injury, chronic pain, or surgery, members must contend with multiple providers and handoffs between those involved with providing a ‘whole person approach’ to care. From the individuals’ perspective, it feels like no one is looking at their health holistically or acting as their healthcare champion. And with many people increasingly working from home due to the coronavirus pandemic, challenges related to musculoskeletal conditions – increasing back pain and joint pain – are likely to increase.

Our September Webinar Series event was presented by Hinge Health’s CEO Dan Perez and addressed the following:

  • Key MSK Challenges & Trends in 2020 and Beyond
  • Fractured State of MSK Care
  • Towards Next-Generation Care
  • World’s Largest Digital MSK Cohort Clinical Study

This post is a recap of the webinar. Contact Hinge Health for access to the webinar recording

For more information on how a digital musculoskeletal clinic – covering the full continuum of care from prevention to post-surgery – can provide a one-stop-shop for health plans, employer groups, and provider organizations, reach out to Hinge Health.

Highlights from Towards Next-Generation Care: The Digital Musculoskeletal (MSK) Clinic

HCEG’s Executive Director Ferris Taylor kicked off the webinar noting how Hinge Health addresses 4 of the 2020 HCEG Top 10 list of challenges, issues, and opportunities facing healthcare leaders.HInge Health MSK Issues Musculoskeletal conditions

Dan Perez provided an overview of how musculoskeletal conditions continue to be the top health care cost driver and how MSK care will have the highest growth rate of any virtual care services over the next few years – and likely beyond. Dan went on to provide an overview of The Hinge Health Digital MSK Clinic, details on the four distinct Digital Care Pathways across the care continuum, and shared information on evidence-based care guidelines from the CDC and American College of Physicians.

RELATED: Spotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge Health

Chronic MSK Pain is Both Physical & Mental

Dan shared information, statistics, and Hinge Health insight on the Gold Standard for Addressing Chronic MSK Pain: a biopsychosocial approach that addresses three key components:

Biological Influence

How exercise therapy can help reduce chronic pain by up to 60%

Psychological Influence

How a belief in oneself often leads to lower pain levels – even 1 to 2 years after the initial intervention

Social Influence

How education and 3rd-party support can empower people to overcome chronic pain

Clinical Care Model Surrounding an Individual

The presentation continued with Dan sharing an overview of the clinical care model upon which Hinge Health’s care model is based. He shared a 1-minute video with webinar participants offering a real-world application of the Hinge Health solution.

The World’s Largest Digital MSK Cohort Study

Details on clinical outcomes from a study of 10,264 participants – validated by researchers at Stanford, Vanderbilt, and top consultants addressing key business questions – were shared:

  • 4 out of 5 participants had meaningful improvement in pain reduction
  • More exercise therapy and coaching resulted in more pain reduction
  • 58% Reduction in depression and anxiety scores
  • More than 2 out of 3 surgeries avoided in Year-1

The presentation concluded with key takeaways on how health plans, employer groups, provider organizations, and other healthcare stakeholders can help their members and patients.

Learn How Hinge Health Can Help Address Costly MSK Issues

To access the webinar recording and for more information on how a digital musculoskeletal clinic – covering the full continuum of care from prevention to post-surgery – can provide a one-stop-shop for members and health plans reach out to Hinge Health.

Our Webinar Series events are one example of how the HealthCare Executive Group helps to share information and promote collaboration between healthcare leaders, change-makers, and stakeholders. Consider joining our newsletter to stay abreast of challenges, issues, and opportunities of importance.

Physician Perspectives on COVID-19 Impact to Fall Season

Webinar: Physician Perspectives on COVID-19 Impact to Fall Season

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In early September, the HealthCare Executive Group hosted an informal discussion with three physician executives. Long-time HCEG board member Dr. David Diloreto, MD, a board-certified ophthalmologist, ophthalmic plastic surgeon, currently a principal at Vizient/Sg2 and prior senior vice-president at GE Healthcare Camden was joined by Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, MD Senior Medical Director in Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health Plan and a practicing pediatrician at Hamilton Health Center, an FQHC in Harrisburg, PA.and Dr. Jason Woo, MD, a practicing board-certified obstetrician/gynecologist and a veteran with 31 years in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service and consultant at the Arbinger Institute.

The discussion was centered on COVID-19’s impact over the past months, what’s changed, what’s remained the same, and what they’ve each observed and learned over the past months – particularly from a clinical and public health role. The following topics were discussed:

Impact Factors Affecting Utilization of ServicesThe Change to Telehealth: New Opportunities for Providers to Connect with Patients
Balancing Treatment to Avoid Ongoing Destruction of Demand for Non-COVID ServicesRethinking the Healthcare Supply-Chain – PPE as a Matter of Trust
Returning to School & Addressing Disadvantaged PopulationsLessons Learned and Lessons to Be Learned
A Pediatric Physician on Sending Kids – Including Her Own – Back to SchoolExperiences from Southern Hemisphere – Seasonal Viruses at All-Time Lows
Impacts on Minorities & Underserved PopulationsValue of Encouraging Use of Masks
Uncertainty in Testing and Understanding Prevalence‘Long Haulers’ – The Unknown, Long-Term Impact of COVID-19
How Long Will We Be Dealing with COVID-19?Financial Impact on Providers, Employer Groups, & Payers
COVID-10 Vaccines & Importance of Fall Flu ShotsEmployers Forced into New Reimbursement Models
Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic – Maintain ImmunizationsDelayed Demand for Non-COVID Services
Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key

The information, insight, ideas, and predictions from this informal discussion are presented in a 3-part blog series and you can read Part 1 and Part 2 with Part 3 coming next week.

Live, Interactive Chat and Q & A – Physician Perspectives on COVID-19

To build on the informal discussion and to provide others with a chance to interact with and ask questions of these physicians, HCEG is hosting a special interactive event on Tuesday, October 13, 2020, at 11:00 am PT/2:00 pm ET. Questions and requests for additional information shared by registrants prior to and/or during the live chat will be fielded by the panelists.

Reserve your seat and submit your questions and comments today!

COVID-19 Insight. COVID-19 Impact to Healthcare: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season. Supply chain challenges. Telehealth virtual health services. Dealing with financial uncertainties. Coronavirus Pandemic. Back to School.

COVID-19 Insight: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season (Part 1)

By | HCEG Content, Resources | One Comment

The coronavirus pandemic has changed the world dramatically. Since late February, healthcare organizations have been largely in crisis mode – adapting to new testing and treatment demands and strategies – all while struggling to stay afloat emotionally, physically, and financially during these difficult times.

  • They’re dealing with supply chain challenges.
  • They’re adopting telehealth or accelerating their existing use of virtual health services.
  • They’re dealing with financial uncertainties due to either their focus on COVID-19 or due to the destruction of demand for non-COVID related services.
  • They’re navigating the harsh reality of a reimbursement system based on volume.

And there are many other changes caused by the pandemic and the response to the pandemic that are not yet known or fully understood.

And now, our school systems are struggling to safely re-open and bring some semblance of normality back to families and children. And as autumn rapidly approaches, addressing concerns about the potential impact from kids returning to school and the fall flu season are topics of discussion among many people.So what’s changed and what’s remained the same? What have healthcare leaders – particularly those serving in clinical and public health roles – observed and learned over the past months? What challenges, issues, and opportunities should they be focusing on? Is there a yin-yang opportunity available?

COVID-19 Insight, Information, & Ideas from Physician Leaders

To help answer these questions, the HealthCare Executive Group hosted an informal discussion with three physician executives. This post, the first in a series of three, shares some highlights and some details from that discussion.

Look for the remaining posts over the next two weeks and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter for more information on potential value to healthcare leaders and change-makers.

Listen to the entire recording here

Physician Leader Panelists

Long-time HCEG board member Dr. David Diloreto, MD, a board-certified ophthalmologist, ophthalmic plastic surgeon, currently a principal at Vizient/Sg2 and prior senior vice-president at GE Healthcare Camden was joined by Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, MD and Dr. Jason Woo, MD.

COVID-19 Impact to Healthcare: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season Panelist Biographies - Dr. David DiloretoCOVID-19 Impact to Healthcare: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season Panelist Biographies - Dr. Johanna Vidal-PhelanCOVID-19 Impact to Healthcare: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season Panelist Biographies - Dr. Jason Woo
Dr. David Diloreto, MDDr. Johanna Vidal-PhelanDr. Jason Woo, MD

Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, MD (Dr. Johanna) is Senior Medical Director in Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health Plan and a practicing pediatrician at Hamilton Health Center, an FQHC in Harrisburg, PA.

Dr. Jason Woo, MD (Dr. Jason) is a practicing board-certified obstetrician/gynecologist and a veteran with 31 years in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service. Dr. Woo is a consultant at the Arbinger Institute.

In addition, HCEG’s Executive Director Ferris Taylor helped to facilitate the discussion and provide HCEG perspectives. For more on the background and expertise of these participant leaders, see their bios here.

Live, Interactive Follow-On Chat and Q & A – October 13th

COVID-19 HealthCare Executive Group hosted an informal discussion with three physician executives.For more detailed information on the topics raised in this series of posts and for a chance to interact with and ask questions of these physicians, join us on October 13, 2020, at 11:00 am PT/2:00 pm ET for a live, interactive follow-on chat and Q & A opportunity.

The physician panelists will provide additional insight on what’s changed and what’s remained the same under COVID-19 with more on what expect this fall and going into 2021.

Questions and requests for additional information shared by registrants prior to and/or during the live chat will be fielded by the panelists. Reserve your seat and submit your questions and comments today!Be sure to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn more about what’s presented in this post – and please share it with your associates.

Discussion Kickoff

Ferris Taylor welcomed everyone, offered a short summary of the goals of the informal discussion and passed the microphone (virtually of course) to Dr. Diloreto to kick off the discussion by sharing some information and insight collected over the last six months.

Physician Executives on COVID-19 Over the Last Six Months

“Supply chain issues this spring and the PPE and pharmaceutical shortages have presented new challenges, issues, and opportunities to analytics companies; re-doing their algorithms to account for co-covered impact factors.

Results of market demand forecasting and essentially what we’re seeing is a lot of what we have been virtual health. we’ve been we’ve probably compressed the trend for adoption of virtual health by five to seven years and now people are figuring out well that was bootstrapping and video conferencing with families but how do we really get the provider workflows adjusted so that this is meaningful and a productive way to deliver care.”Physician Executives on COVID-19 Over the Last Six Months

Impact Factors Affecting Utilization of Services

“The other thing we’re looking at that’s interesting is how the impact factors are affecting utilization of services. Early on we saw folks just avoiding the emergency room even staying home with symptoms of stroke and myocardial infarction. The high acuity services have returned but low acuity services have not, and we don’t believe they ever will.

These are things that basically probably shouldn’t have been in the emergency room to start with and folks are finding ways to deal with it. High acuity conditions like TAVR (Transcutaneous Aortic Valve Replacement) procedures and neurosurgical procedures are actually coming back really strong. People almost at full comparing the first six months of 2019 the first six months of 2020 basically the same utilization rates.

What’s interesting are more elective procedures including things like PE tubes in children – which have only come back to about 40 %. And so one of the issues there is could be a combination of factors. In the social distancing that was happening in the spring maybe there was less UTI and eye infections. On the other hand, families that we know are avoiding preventive services. There may be children with chronic ear infections not getting detected now. There are things that may play out long term that we have to figure out. So there’s a variable return of on the provider side of certain services.”

Dr. David went on to share more about:

Balancing Treatment to Avoid Ongoing Destruction of Demand for Non-COVID Services

COVID-19 Non-COVID Elective Services

  1. They have to balance the treatment of COVID positive patients and non-COVID positive patients in the pandemic. And we watch those surges in places like Tampa and Los Angeles and Houston last month. And actually the provider community is getting a lot better at being able to balance that care. We know more about early intervention with certain treatments. There’s less folks going on onto ventilators and obviously we’re protecting the most vulnerable people in the elderly and institutions much better. 
  1. On the other hand, the impacts financially both from demand destruction as well as increased costs are huge. We’re seeing provider groups, hospitals and health systems really having to deal now with not only the near-term financial recovery but also some very significant economic issues. We’re looking at unemployment rates in Florida right now and in Orlando where there’s high rates of people employed in tourism and entry-level service jobs unemployment rate of about 20%.

Returning to School & Addressing Disadvantaged Populations

  1. Should I send my children to school? What should I look for? Am I at risk? How will they (children) interact with aunts and uncles and grandparents? Is it really safe? And if they don’t go to school, what does that mean? 
  1. The impact in disadvantaged communities has been huge and it plays out in interesting ways not just in urban centers but was really interesting as we watched the surges in Los Angeles, Tampa and Houston as they came down the nearby rural areas particularly where you had either migrant workers and low-income workers in fields they were getting infected at very high rates. That’s probably sort of the fits and starts with this that we’re going to have throughout this pandemic until there’s widespread use of vaccines, herd immunity and more effective therapies

A Pediatrician on Sending Kids – Including Her Own – Back to School

HCEG Three Physicians on COVID-19 A Pediatrician on Sending Kids – Including Her Own - Back to School

Dr. Johanna was asked: What are you advising your patients on when they ask you: “Is it safe to send someone to school? As both a Practicing pediatrician and a parent of two school aged children, Johanna shared:

“So that’s a very important question and each family will have a different solution. I think that the first thing I have to tell parents and including myself as a parent is to empower the parent to make the decision. And there’s no wrong or right decision. You need to do what’s right for your family. And so, in partnership with the school district where your children are, I’m going to think about different things that had happened in the last 10 years for families and children. This has been one of those aspects that had created a lot of anxiety for families including myself. And I think a topic of importance to discuss is in regard to the home environment. 

Most of the kids in the state of Pennsylvania are not having the opportunity to return to school full-time – so not five days. They’re doing a hybrid model or fully online. What is the impact for a working family that has to figure out how to come up with new solutions in regard to the care of the children during the days that they are not in school?”

Impacts to Minorities & Underserved Populations

“And the financial hardship that that may represent to a family. I’ve seen families make very challenging decisions where one of the parents is no longer working. So that parent can help with the children in the home environment for schooling. And other families are sending their children though they don’t want to, or they don’t feel comfortable because they have to go to work. I’ve seen a really dramatic impact in Latinos and minorities. As you know, Latino families/minorities families are mainly in the service industry – many of us. So what happens is that the level of exposure to COVID-19 is higher – disproportionately impacting African Americans and Latinos. 

So you think about families and the impact in children and what that means to them is significant. It is a very challenging question. Parents ask me all the time in the pediatric practice and I respond with the answer: What is it that is important to you as a family? What is it that you can provide or not for your children education? And then we have a frank discussion about what the family will need to do.”HCEG Uncertainty in COVID-19 Testing and Understanding Prevalence

Uncertainty in Testing & Understanding Prevalence

Dr. Jason followed on with:

“I think, coming from the public health perspective particularly the FDA background, there’s just so much uncertainty in the testing and understanding incidents prevalence and what the outcome of an infection is. It’s so critical to be non-judgmental of what – as you pointed out Johanna – each family has to figure out what’s best for them. 

As we’re providing services, part of the challenge is to be aware of the individuality that has to be accounted for each of the patients or each of the patients coming or families coming into the healthcare system and trying to figure out what’s right for them.”

A Perfect Petri “Diamond Princess” Dish – Wasted

“I think the one thing I kicked myself is, at the beginning of all this, I was so certain that we would have such good data from the date of the Diamond Princess. There were 3000 patients, they’ve been isolated, they’re dropping CDC resources in there, they’re doing sampling and we’re going to have so much information. And then after two weeks and nothing’s coming out. I had completely missed out. 

We talk about the public health system being underfunded but I never expected us to be so poorly informed in terms of the data of the natural course of the infection, of infectivity, of how quickly it spreads and how it spreads. And so now with the plethora of different testing and the different way things are being approved by the FDA, I think it’s challenging because it’s just not the kind of data or standards that we would have had when we did Ebola, when we did Zika. 

I wouldn’t say it’s for lack of knowing how to deal (with it), it’s just the challenge of not having a sort of a standard upfront approach prepared to go up front. And I don’t say politics. I don’t want to point fingers at all in this.”

RELATED: Leadership, Trust & Skills in Overcoming Obstacles to Radical Innovation in Healthcare

How Long Will We Be Dealing with COVID-19?

Ferris mentioned reading about a poll asking physicians when physicians are expecting to be “on top of or ahead of COVID-19.” Ferris related that 50% of physician respondents are expecting that we won’t be on top or ahead of COVID until June of 2021.How Long Will We Be Dealing with COVID-19?

Dr. David shared some other insight from his organization:

“Our projections are that we’ll be dealing with a pandemic situation probably into the fourth quarter of next year (2021) simply because the production and distribution of effective vaccines – and of course the early trials are encouraging – but it’s still a monumental undertaking. And also, we still don’t know the issues about long-term effectiveness (of any vaccine). There’s still a lot of volatility around that.” 

“It seems like 2020 has been a decade. We’re finally in August and so in addition to dealing with an ongoing pandemic, we’ll have seasonal viruses and seasonal respiratory infections starting to come into play. Tell us a little bit about how you think it’ll affect frontline practices particularly with respect to testing strategies and recommendations for families.”

Dr. Jason countered:

“The question is: what do states do at this point in terms of making requirements that some of the school-age kids must meet to even participate? 

I think New York already came out with the mandatory testing; I think California also as well. There’s certainly been a lot of confusion. There are factors that – as you point out – variables that if kids aren’t in school how does that affect exposure rates that we’re not going to project the uncertainty as a provider. I think that you’re presented with where folks are coming in is certainly so dependent upon where our testing capabilities are. And how much better knowledge we have. And how quickly folks can respond to that. And that’s why it’s very difficult. 

It gets back to the uncertainty of how quickly these conditions continue to evolve and to what extent we’re able to get better information. There seems to be a lot of people working very hard at it but there’s just so much variation in the testing and so I think it’s going to be particularly hard for providers to make that (decision) but there’s just still a lot of uncertainty about what those actual prevalence rates are going to be with the different conditions. 

I’d also ask, if kids aren’t in school, how does that affect the general trend of seasonal viruses?”COVID-19 Insight. COVID-19 Impact to Healthcare: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season. Supply chain challenges. Telehealth virtual health services. Dealing with financial uncertainties. Coronavirus Pandemic. Back to School.

Part 2 Coming Soon – More COVID-19 Insight from Physician Executives

In the next post of this three-part series, highlights and details on the following topics from the informal discussion with Dr. Diloreto, Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, and Dr. Jason Woo will be shared:

  • COVID-10 Vaccines & Importance of Fall Flu Shots
  • Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic – Maintain Immunizations
  • Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key
  • The Change to Telehealth: New Opportunities for Providers to Connect with Patients
  • Rethinking the Healthcare Supply-Chain – PPE as a Matter of Trust

Live, Interactive Follow-On Chat and Q & A – October 13th

For more detailed information on the topics raised in this series of posts and for a chance to interact with and ask questions of these physician executives, join us on October 13, 2020, at 11:00 am PT/2:00 pm ET for a live, interactive follow-on chat and Q & A opportunity.

The physician panelists will provide additional insight on what’s changed, what’s remained the same, and what may be expected this fall and going into 2021. Questions and requests for additional information shared by registrants prior to and/or during the live chat will be fielded by the panelists.

Reserve your seat and submit your questions and comments today!Be sure to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn more about what’s presented in this post – and please share it with your associates. And if you are not a subscriber to our newsletter, consider joining 5000+ other healthcare leaders, change-makers, and industry participants and subscribe today!

Webinar: Towards Next-Generation Care: The Digital Musculoskeletal (MSK) Clinic

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Currently, health plan members with back and joint pain experience a fragmented approach to care. Whether it’s an acute injury, chronic pain, or surgery, members must contend with multiple providers and handoffs between those involved with providing a ‘whole-person approach’ to care. From the members’ perspective, it feels like no one is looking at their health holistically or acting as their healthcare champion.

Join us and other healthcare leaders for our September Webinar Series Event: Towards Next-Generation Care: The Digital Musculoskeletal (MSK) Clinic on Thursday, September 17, 2020 at 11:00 am PT / 2:00 pm ET.

In this webinar, Hinge Health’s CEO Dan Perez will discuss how a digital musculoskeletal clinic covering the full continuum of care from prevention to post-surgery can provide a one-stop shop for members and health plans. Register today and learn how to improve outcomes, engage your members and lower costs!

Webinar Discussion Topics

  1. Current MSK Challenges
  2. Fragmented Continuum of Care
  3. The Digital MSK Clinic
  4. Deep Dive: Chronic MSK Digital Pathway
  5. Insights from the World’s Largest Digital MSK Cohort Clinical Study
Healthcare Innovation and Disruption, HealthCare Executive Group, HCEG, 16th Annual World Health Care Congress (WHCC), CIO & CTO Strategy Track, innovation, disruption. healthcare champions, Data Analytics, Pharmacy Costs and Transparency, Importance of Useable Technology, Cybersecurity, HCEG Top 10, Center for Healthcare Innovation (CHI), International Association of Innovation Professionals,

To learn more, read about Overcoming Chronic Pain: The Hinge Health Clinical Model of Care.

Presenters

Dan Perez is CEO and Co-Founder of Hinge Health
Dan PerezFerris Taylor<Announced Soon>
CEO and Co-Founder of Hinge HealthExecutive Director, HealthCare Executive GroupHinge Health Customer

More About Hinge Health & The Digital Clinical Model of Care

Read this recent Sponsor Spotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs to learn more about Hinge Health and how failures in the continuum of MSK care are addressed with a patient-centered Digital Clinic for back & joint pain.Spotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge HealthContact Hinge Health here

 

Visit Hinge Health’s Website

Connect with Hinge Health on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook

 

The Collective Voice of Health IT – Inaugural Podcast. HCEG Healthcare Executive Group, podcast

The Collective Voice in Health IT – Inaugural Podcast

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The Collective Voice in Health IT is a new podcast series launched by our partner WEDI – the Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange. The intent of this new podcast series is to offer engaging and intimate discussions with prominent healthcare thought leaders on both current and emerging themes and topics in healthcare: market trends, information technology, and regulations and policies. These important topics are examined from many different angles including the intersection of strategy, operations, marketing, big data, and clinical programs – among other important areas and viewpoints.

In the inaugural episode, Matthew Albright, Communication Committee Chair for WEDI and Chief Legislative Affairs Officer for Zelis Payments and Ferris Taylor, HCEG’s Executive Director, discuss how challenges, issues, and opportunities identified by the 2020 HCEG Top 10 list have exposed inequities and inadequacies in our healthcare system. Matt and Ferris explore priorities top of mind less than six months ago;  where those priorities were then and where they are now. To wit, they compare topics ‘Before Coronavirus’ (BC) to where they stand now.

Also included is a discussion about the 2020 Industry Pulse and the recently completed COVID-19 Flash Update survey measuring how priorities identified when the 2020 Industry Pulse was released in February of this year to where healthcare leaders and change-makers think those priorities lie now. The following are some highlights of the inaugural episode of The Collective Voice in Health IT. Listen to the complete podcast here and access a transcript of the entire podcast here. And look for future episodes here.

Subscribe to the HCEG eNewsletter here.

Connect, Collaborate & Create – The Collective Voice in Health IT

Matt Albright asked Ferris Taylor: How do we deal with the costs of specialty pharmaceuticals and continue going forward with respect to vaccines and testing and everything else is coming with COVID-19? But even more importantly, right behind that fundamental change of Costs & Transparency was: What’s happening with the consumer and the consumer experience?

Ferris responded:

“The transition (to the healthcare consumer and the consumer experience) has been slow to develop in healthcare. It was gaining more understanding from both the payers and the providers and all the stakeholders in healthcare of what it really means to be consumer-centric. We know what that means with Amazon or what it means with Alexa, but healthcare was far away from that in terms of consumer centricity and, of course, delivery system transformation, which could include how we make this transition from fee-for-service to value-based reimbursement.

But prior to the coronavirus pandemic, it (the transformation of healthcare) was already deep into digital health and personalized medicine, and holistic healthcare at the personal level.

Now obviously things have changed in the last few months. We couldn’t be more positive that the consumer healthcare experience in the last few months has been less than par. And, of course, one of the biggest and more obvious changes in healthcare has been around the HCEG Top 10 item labeled as Accessible Points of Care. Telehealth has exploded, driven by the absolute necessity for consumers to shelter in place. But the fact they (consumers) still needed access to care and also by providers recognizing that it wasn’t desirable to have patients come into their offices. So that blip in the concerns and issues that were being addressed in coronavirus has certainly impacted the Top 10. And we’ll see statistically how that has changed with the COVID flash survey that we’re just completing right now during the end of July.”

Social Determinants of Health – Aka. Barriers to Entry

Ferris shared his insight on how the coronavirus pandemic has drawn focus to the impact of social determinants of health and the importance of addressing the ‘barriers to health care.”HCEG Top 10. Social Determinants of Health. Barriers to Health

“I guess the other change, a couple of changes, are to Healthcare Policy, number nine on the HCEG Top 10 for 2020, most certainly has moved up. It seems like regulations change every day. And I’m seeing more discussion around Population Health that has been there (on the HCEG Top 10) for many years. It was starting to get described in the term that we most commonly use: Social Determinants of Health. I personally prefer Barriers to Health but for some reason healthcare has historically and narrowly defined healthcare as medical intervention and has excluded the barriers to health. COVID-19 has certainly challenged that thinking and changed the way that we are thinking about healthcare.”

Matt added:

“I think what’s interesting is when you talk about the priorities coming into 2020 absolutely things have changed. Absolutely its flipped – everything’s been flipped on its head. But the issues themselves or, if you will, the categories of issues haven’t changed, right?

So you talk about Digital Health which we see expressed through Telehealth. You talk about Consumer-Based or Consumer-Centric healthcare. And you talk about how, in the last six months, we’ve seen how that’s kind of failed on a certain level. And certainly, Social Determinants of Health has played itself out in the inequities in the races and the genders and the status of the people who have been ended up hospitalized and actually dying of this disease.  

So actually, it seems to me in 2019 the priorities and what came out of your Top 10 had it right? It’s just that now it’s been put under a pressure test. All of those issues have kind of sped up. And the other thing, which I think is interesting and maybe it’s tied somehow to how it’s affected consumer-based health, is that everybody’s talking about it. Right?

I had no idea that at the beginning of this year that I would know so much about viruses and how they were spread and so much about how vaccines were pursued.”

Healthcare Reform – Needs a Grass Roots Movement?

[31:09 – 32:40]

Matt Albright: “I think healthcare has suddenly become a dining room table conversation, a backyard barbecue topic – with social distancing, of course. A conversation where people are talking about the priorities of their group or a group in a specific industry – and looking to their own industry. Suddenly, this industry (healthcare) is everybody’s concern and suddenly every aspect of what you just talked about: telehealth, digital health, inequalities, all of those issues are suddenly being discussed by the people.

Matt queried Ferris with two questions about the ongoing pace and longevity of processes and approaches wrought by the pandemic.

  1. Do you think that, because everybody’s talking about it, there will be a grassroots push to see these things sped up? Virtual health, telehealth, the exchange, data interchange, interoperability of health IT, and transparency issues. Or do you think we’re going to be so exhausted as a healthcare industry after this pandemic, especially at the provider and hospital levels, are kind of economically bereft that we won’t be able to move forward very fast?
  2. How do you think the last six months adds to what’s going to happen next once we conquer this thing?

Never Let a Good Crisis Go to Waste

[32:50-34:40]

Ferris shared how the coronavirus crisis has accelerated the transformation of the healthcare system:

“One of our board members, a past COO at a large payer in the Pacific Northwest, said: ‘Don’t waste a crisis but take advantage of it.’ And in some ways, that old and trite saying that: ‘necessity is the mother of invention’ – is really coming into play here. Healthcare was already moving from analog to digital. We can come back to fax machines at some other point.”

Inequities & Inadequacies Exposed

[35:30 – 37:38]

“The COVID crisis has exposed a lot of inequities and inadequacies in our healthcare system. Lack of preparation. Safety concerns. We were disregarding a lot of public health issues that are now very much top of mind. And underneath all of that is as I listen to our members and the discussions back and forth, going back to this 2019 HCEG Top 10 priority number one Data & Analytics, it’s now moved to much more of a foundational function across Costs & Transparency, Consumerism, and Digital Transformation.

At the heart of these priorities are the challenges have also been exposed around electronic data aggregation, how we exchange data, how we get the right data at the right time about the right person in the hands of the right decision-maker in a near real-time environment to function as a healthcare system. And so platforms, technology infrastructure, interoperability, as you mentioned, have become significantly more important in terms of supporting healthcare and moving us from a transactional type of consumer experience to a much more continuous interactive, personalized, holistic consumer experience in health.”

“There isn’t a single person in the United States that is not much more cognizant of their personal health, how they feel, and how they’re protecting their health today than they were six months ago. It’s a different world.” – Ferris Taylor

When Will Consumer-Driven Healthcare Take Hold?

[42:47 – 44:48]

Matt Albright shared:

“And you know, I’m an impatient American. So my next question to you is going to be: When? I think we’ve legislatively done things out of emergency and some of the states and certainly CMS is kind of pushing to keep certainly some of the waivers that are in telehealth to keep them permanent. So we’re starting to see that already but on the same token the interoperability rule enforcement has been delayed because the hospitals just don’t have the bandwidth to make that lift right now. And the transparency rules are being argued in court.

So I guess, I don’t think we have the question here, but when are we going to see this consumer-driven healthcare take place? And when are we going to see, McKinsey says 20% of our healthcare visits will be virtual – our healthcare payouts – be in just a year or two? When do you think we’re going to see that? Is that going to have to wait for Congress to have lots of discussions about it and three or four years later we have regulations? What do you think?

Ferris responded:

“Well, and you know, there’s an interesting connection between Congress and the healthcare consumer. And that is, Congress exists because of voters. And voters are consumers of healthcare and consumers have experienced a very different healthcare environment in the last six months than they had experienced over the last number of years or even decades.

So part of the answer around when (consumer-driven health becomes widespread) shows up in the emergency orders, the state initiatives, governors’ responses, and even at the federal level some of the initiatives and emergency orders that President Trump and others, agencies have issued and put out there.”

RELATED: Surviving Coronavirus Pandemic & Thriving on the Other Side: Rapid Innovation & Telehealth

Healthcare System Survival Mode – Uncertain Recovery Timeline

[44:49 – 46:57]

Ferris shared an analogy and his take on when the healthcare system may recover.

“Obviously, along with when is how, how do we finance it? And how do all of those pieces come together? Right today, it’s hard right today to give a specific answer to your question. I kind of feel, I don’t know about you, but I feel hunkered down in the foxhole in the middle of a war with bullets flying. Flying over my head. I’m sheltering in place. I haven’t been on a plane since I think the last time I saw you in Jacksonville. And that was my last trip and I had a whole bunch of them planned but life has changed. But when you’re in that foxhole, it’s not the time to stand up and get up on a Podium and say let’s do this. Let’s do that.

I think we’re in a survival mode right now in healthcare. We’re still dealing with a surge. But as we start to flatten the curve and as we get back into the Healthcare System, the benefit designs to deal with a pandemic like COVID and the incorporation (of new services) into those designs and into the pricing for 2021. Or it might even be that it takes 2022 to get all of the financial part of this back in place so we have a stable healthcare system.

I have no doubt that we will get back to this new reality of consumerism, transparency, interoperability and the incorporation of 21st Century Technologies: artificial intelligence, machine learning, interoperability and real-time data exchange.”

Inveterate (Chronic) Innovation – Table Stakes for Survival

[47:03 -47:27]

“So, I think the answer to your question is: this too will pass, and we will get through COVID-19. I don’t know exactly when that will be. But on the other side in my 30 years in healthcare, I continue to just be very impressed with the inveterate innovation that has come into healthcare.

[49:27 – 51:41]

Innovation is here to stay. It’ll have to get priced out. It will have to get built into the financial models that make healthcare work. Hospitals, some hospitals are doing fine financially. Some, especially rural hospitals, are under extreme pressure. Different specialties in healthcare are experiencing different results. Health plans are concerned about all of the delayed, non-essential healthcare comes back. Is that going to hit them financially and with premium increases?

We’re a very state of the art, world-renowned healthcare industry and we’ll figure this out. I think that stability on the other side of the bridge will be consumer-centric. It’ll be transparent – whether it’s from costs or delivery processes or anything else. The delivery system will be much more virtual and if you push me, I’m going to say some time in 2021 – for sure 2022 – we’ll be back on track.”

Matt Albright added:

“Good. Ferris, I think you bring a great perspective. There’s no longer looking forward to Innovation. Innovation has already happened and we’re not calling it innovation anymore. We’re calling what we do on a day-to-day basis now with healthcare as innovation. I think that’s a terrific point. And I think there’s a lot to be said for how quickly our healthcare system reacted and proactively moved to take care of this pandemic.

And frankly, I’d probably have to say the same for our political systems. They came out very quickly. The governors came out very quickly with emergency orders that freed the providers to do what they needed to do. And even Congress, there’s a criticism to be had there, but they turned things around very quickly to get things moving. So, I think that’s a great point, things are already happening. Things are already here. Maybe there’s nothing that we need to wait for?”

2020 Industry Pulse Flash Update

[51:42 – 52:28]

Matt concluded the inaugural episode of The Collective Voice in Health IT podcast series with a question as to when the results and analysis of the COVID-19 Industry Pulse Flash Update survey will be available.

Ferris shared:

“I looked at the initial results of the flash survey on Tuesday, so just two days ago. We’ll have something ready to publish in two to three weeks. And I think Michael (McNutt – WEDI  Director of Education & Events) and Charles (Stellar – WEDI CEO) and you and I have talked about coming back here in August with a WEDI-specific webinar. We can have questions coming in and be able to respond to those in an interactive way. So three to four weeks and we’ll be back on the air. Thank you, Matt, Michael, and Charles, for a great discussion.”

RELATED: Connecting the Dots: COVID-19, HCEG Top 10, & Industry PulseHCEG Top 10 Industry Pulse Research

Connect, Collaborate & Create Solutions – The Collective Voice in Health IT

Matt closed the initial episode of The Collective Voice in Health IT with a call for the health information technology community to connect, collaborate, and create solutions for a Better Health System. If you’d like to participate in identifying, creating, and sharing information, ideas, and opinions on areas of interest to healthcare leaders and change-makers, reach out to us here.

Subscribe to the HCEG Newsletter here.

Spotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge Health

Spotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge Health

By | Sponsor | 2 Comments

Employers and health plans interested in truly solving their musculoskeletal (MSK) issues must assemble a collection of disconnected vendors such as prevention/wellness, tele-PT, digital programs, expert medical opinion, centers of excellence (COEs) – resulting in a fragmented member care experience.

To address these failures in the continuum of MSK care, our most recent sponsor, Hinge Health, is pioneering the world’s most patient-centered Digital Clinic for back & joint pain. By expanding their clinical capabilities to provide an end-to-end Digital MSK Clinic, Hinge Health meets members along the MSK continuum of care from prevention to post-surgery.

RELATED: The World’s First Digital Clinic for Back and Joint Pain

Hinge Health’s Clinical Care Model Delivers Industry’s Best Engagement & Outcomes

Hinge Health’s virtual clinical care model

Through its use of virtual physical therapy, behavioral health coaching, and digital sensor technology, Hinge Health’s virtual clinical care model delivers the industry’s best engagement and outcomes. The clinical expertise of our physical therapists paired with the motivational and behavioral training of our health coaches results in the industry’s highest adherence rate with a participant completion rate 3x the industry average.

Hinge Health’s solution addresses several key items on the 2020 HCEG Top 10 including Costs & Transparency (#1), Consumer Experience (#2), Holistic Individual Health (#6), and Accessible Points of Care (#8). As patients avoid doctor and hospital visits during COVID-19, Hinge Health’s at-home digital MSK care provides a more holistic and accessible approach to care resulting in better outcomes at a lower cost.

RELATED: Overcoming Chronic Pain: Hinge Health’s Clinical Model of Care

Musculoskeletal Outcomes Validated by Stanford, UCSF & Vanderbilt

With all the hype around digital health, many employers and health plans might be wondering: Do digital health solutions actually solve chronic back or joint pain and reduce medical spend? MSK issues are the number one cost driver for medical spend—outpacing other conditions such as diabetes and cancer.  However, in the world’s largest digital MSK study, researchers from Stanford, University of California San Francisco, and Vanderbilt University, demonstrated that Hinge Health’s digital MSK solution directly results in better outcomes at lower spend.

With over 10,000 participants, the longitudinal cohort study revealed that Hinge Health resulted in:Spotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge Health. revention/wellness, tele-PT, digital programs, expert medical opinion, centers of excellence (COEs)

  • 69% average pain reduction–that’s 4x more pain reduction compared to opioids
  • 58% average reduction in depression & anxiety
  • 3 in 4 participants completed the program, making it the industry’s highest 12- week adherence rate
  • $5,012 medical claims savings per participant per year

RELATED: Cutting Through the Hype: Does Digital Health Actually Work?

Partnering with Employers & Health Plans

With nearly 200 enterprise customers, Hinge Health partners with employers and health plans to address member MSK pain and reduce high medical costs. With Hinge Health’s fast and easy implementation process, customers can deliver at-home digital care to help resolve members’ chronic back and joint pain.

See 6 Reasons Hinge Health Offers a Record 4-Week Turnkey Implementation for more information.

Customer Testimonials on Value of Musculoskeletal Program

Having nearly quadrupled their customer base in 12 months, Hinge Health is privileged to be the choice of 4 in 5 employers with a digital MSK solution including Boeing, AutoZone, US Foods, Southern Company, Walgreens, PwC, FujiFilm, and more.

Employee EngagementSingle, Coordinated ProgramEvidence-Based Design
Hinge Health musculoskeletal platform programs. MSK. wellness, prevention, tele-rehabilitation, digital applications, expert clinical opinion, best practice guidelines. Digital Care Pathways. Exercise Therapy. Behavioral Support & Coaching. Education. Wearables, Health Coaching. Costs & Transparency. Consumer Experience. Holistic Individual Health. Accessible Points of CareSpotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge HealthSpotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge Health

Additional Information on Hinge Health’s Musculoskeletal Platform

Check out the Hinge Health website, the Hinge Health blog, and the following information on how musculoskeletal solutions can help improve outcomes, lower costs, and improve member engagement.

Engage with Hinge Health

For more information and to discuss how our sponsor partner Hinge Health can provide the best care for your employer or health plan members, contact Hinge Health today.

(855) 902-2777

[email protected]

[email protected]

2020 Industry Pulse Survey – COVID-19 Flash Survey. HCEG. Healthcare Executive Group. Change Healthcare. 2020 Industry Pulse Report. digital connectivity, interoperability, privacy, security, and performance. COVID-19 pandemic. @HCExecGroup

COVID-19 Healthcare Industry Pulse Flash Survey

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Just four months ago in late February, the Healthcare Executive Group and Change Healthcare published the results of the 2020 Industry Pulse Report. This annual research survey is based on the 2020 HCEG Top 10 list and presents details and insight from a broad spectrum of healthcare industry leaders – specifically their insight, ideas, and opinions on the challenges, issues, and opportunities they expect to face during the coming year.

You can learn more about the 2020 Industry Pulse Report and what the leaders of the health plans, health systems, hospitals, medical providers, associations, governmental organizations, vendors, and others who responded to the survey think in this article: Insight from Healthcare Leaders & Change Makers – The 2020 Industry Pulse Report.

Take the COVID-19 Healthcare Industry Pulse Flash Survey today!

COVID-19 Changes Everything – Or Has It?

And then came the coronavirus pandemic. Everything changed overnight across all industries – and the healthcare ecosystem seems to have borne the major brunt of impact:

  • Professional services done largely face to face were transferred to ‘telemedicine’ or telehealth channels with patients, health plans, providers, and all clinical and administrative staff consuming or providing these important services from remote locations – most often their homes
  • Federal, state and country organizations released regulations, new rules, and policy changes on coverage and payment for telehealth services, coronavirus-related testing, and treatment
  • More and more people started working exclusively from home or other non-traditional office settings – highlighting the importance of digital connectivity, interoperability, privacy, security, and performance

And now healthcare leaders are scrambling to ensure the survival of their organizations – reviewing initiatives and programs underway just months ago – and reassessing longer-term plans, business models, partnerships, and other fundamental aspects.

2020 Healthcare Industry Pulse Flash Survey –  What has COVID-19 Changed?

To help identify how the COVID-19 pandemic may have altered the insight and opinion offered by 445 respondents to the 2020 Industry Pulse Report only four months ago, the HealthCare Executive Group and Change Healthcare have created a “COVID-19 Healthcare Industry Pulse Flash SurveyHCEG Healthcare Executive Group COVID-19 Healthcare Industry Pulse Flash Survey

Learn Something You Probably Didn’t Know?

This 2020 Healthcare Industry Pulse Flash Survey takes about 5-7 minutes to complete – a bit faster if you don’t offer any comments. This survey closes on Friday, July 10th so please consider taking this short survey now.

The topics, survey questions, and potential responses proffered in this COVID-19 Healthcare Industry Pulse Flash Survey may themselves offer some ideas and considerations you may not have considered. And the accompanying ‘readout analysis’ will be shared afterward.

Please share this survey with your associates. Let’s all not only survive the COVID-19 pandemic but thrive afterward.

RELATED: Connecting the Dots: COVID-19, HCEG Top 10, & Industry Pulse

Explore Healthcare’s Core Challenges with Peers

What will remain after the coronavirus pandemic passes remains to be seen, but for sure, the core challenges of healthcare will have changed forever. The results of this COVID-19 Healthcare Industry Pulse Flash Survey will be shared publicly in August. You can connect with other healthcare leaders and change-makers working together to maintain the safety, security, and health of the American people via any of the following channels.

RELATED: Surviving Coronavirus Pandemic & Thriving on the Other Side: Rapid Innovation & Telehealth