Physician Perspectives on COVID-19 Impact to Fall Season (Part 2)

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Late last month, the HealthCare Executive Group hosted an informal discussion with three physician executives on their observations, experiences, and insight about how COVID-19 has impacted healthcare and healthcare stakeholders. The theme of the discussion was: “What’s changed, what’s remained the same, and what can we expect in the coming fall season?”

HCEG board member Dr. David Diloreto, MD, a board-certified ophthalmologist, ophthalmic plastic surgeon, a principal at Vizient/Sg2 and prior senior vice-president at GE Healthcare Camden was joined by:

Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, MD, Senior Medical Director in Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health Plan and a practicing pediatrician at Hamilton Health Center, an FQHC in Harrisburg, PA and Dr. Jason Woo, MD a practicing board-certified obstetrician/gynecologist, a veteran with 31 years in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service and a consultant at the Arbinger Institute.

HCEG’s Executive Director Ferris Taylor helped to facilitate the discussion and provided an HCEG perspective.

This is the second post of a three-part series sharing highlights of that conversation. See the first part here and consider subscribing to our newsletter to receive the final post and other information of value to healthcare leaders and change-makers.

Topics Discussed in Part 1

The trio of physician executives discussed the following topics in the first post of this series:

  • Impact Factors Affecting Utilization of Services
  • Balancing Treatment to Avoid Ongoing Destruction of Demand for Non-COVID Services
  • Returning to School & Addressing Disadvantaged Populations
  • A Pediatric Physician on Sending Kids – Including Her Own – Back to School
  • Impacts on Minorities & Underserved Populations
  • Uncertainty in Testing and Understanding Prevalence
  • How Long Will We Be Dealing with COVID-19?

Look for the final post next week and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter for more information of potential value to healthcare leaders and change-makers.

Listen to the entire recording here

Live, Interactive Follow-On Chat and Q&A – October 13th

For more detailed information on the topics presented in this series of posts and for a chance to interact with and ask questions of these physician leaders, join us on October 13, 2020 at 11:00am PT/2:00 pm ET for a live, interactive follow-on chat. The physician panelists will provide additional insight on what’s changed, what’s remained, and what can be expected for the coming fall and winter season under COVID-19.

Questions and requests for additional information shared by registrants prior to and/or during the live chat will be fielded by the panelists. Reserve your seat and submit your questions and comments today!Be sure to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn more about what’s presented in this post – and please share it with your associates.

COVID-19 Vaccines & Fall Flu Shots

A significant part of the discussion continued on the development of a COVID vaccine and the importance of getting a seasonal flu shot to avoid undue burden to services and potential mis-diagnoses of the seasonal flu as COVID-19. Dr. Johanna shared:

Importance of Flu Shots – Minimize Avoidable Impacts

“We saw a decline of seasonal viruses during the spring and early beginning of the summer. I think right now you have to think about the monumental impact of children returning to school even if it’s for two days. Our children (Dr. Johanna’s children) have been with us since March 13th at 4 p.m. when the school released them and said ‘They’re not coming back. We don’t know when.’

 And so our children haven’t really been exposed to a lot of other people, so we do know that children are going to be exposed not only to COVID-19 but all the other normal viruses that we see; or bacteria like strep throat. I think one of the important messages that I’ve been sharing with my family since day one is the importance of the flu vaccine. And there is a lot of misinformation and misunderstanding about the flu vaccine. People still believe that you get sick from the flu vaccine. That you are going to develop the flu from the flu vaccine. A lot of families, almost not even 50 % of the population in the United States, do not get the flu vaccine every year. “

Is Herd Immunity a Potential Solution?

Dr. Johanna continued:Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic - Maintain Immunizations Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key

“And so if we want to have a good herd immunity, it is important and I explained to the parents, that providing the flu vaccine to your child and your family is a way to combat a coronavirus. And they look at me like ‘Why? It’s a different virus.’

 And I said: ‘because when your child gets sick with the flu, because you didn’t want to get the flu shot, we are going to have a very hard time differentiating between COVID-19 or the flu. So we have to test your child for both viruses and then there’s going to create a level of anxiety regarding school, quarantine and care that your child is going to need because we don’t know if it’s the flu.’”

Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic – Maintain Immunizations

“Now you can get the flu after getting the flu vaccine but you’re going to be protected from some of the major complications that we see when you have a natural illness and the duration of the illness is much shorter instead of being two to three weeks with the natural illness, it may be two to three days.

 So I explained to the parents the importance of getting all the children’s immunizations on time. And believe it or not, there’s a critical important piece of information I need families to understand: Even though throughout most of COVID-19 pediatricians are open and family doctors are seeing children too, the importance of the well-child visit to be up-to-date and your teenagers, and the shots is critical – because we don’t want to change this pandemic for a measles epidemic or whooping cough so we have vaccines to prevent illnesses so let’s use them, let’s get them.”Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic - Maintain Immunizations Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key

Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key

Dr. Jason shared the importance of reaching out to underserved populations is a trustful manner:

“I think there’s a communication point that has to be addressed- particularly for the underprivileged populations – is that getting vaccinations has to come from people who sound and look like them. It cannot come from the systems. And that’s where engaging your community outreach folks is going to be so critical to be able to get those. And it may not be having them coming to the hospital. It may be having the local pharmacy or having folks who are able to engage them there.

 Because just as you point out Johanna, there’s so much mistrust and particularly folks are just when you can put the message through a medium that they’re more comfortable with that’s just going to be that’s so critical to address some of the social determinants that inhibit a lot of our understanding.”

Dr. David added:

“And that’s encouraging because it’s going to be needed coming forward. CVS for instance has 1800 testing sites right now around the United States that they’re expanding and they’re in negotiations to become vaccination centers. So just to your point that the neighborhood drug store being actually now a health hub where you can get vaccinated.”

The Change to Telehealth

One of the clear changes instigated by the coronavirus pandemic is the rapid adoption of telehealth. Stay-at-home and physical-distancing directives forced providers to rapidly adopt telehealth services or expand existing telehealth capabilities. Long hampered by reimbursement and physician adoption challenges, telehealth use exploded at the end of the 1st quarter of 2022 and has now become table-stakes.

Ferris prompted the panelists to share their take on telehealth and Dr. Johanna began:

Physicians Warming to Telehealth

“So I definitely also want to emphasize the importance of innovation and technology. I would talk to peers six months ago if somebody was telling me that I was going to do a tele-visit. I would have left. I was like: ‘I cannot see a pediatric patient by computer or phone.’

And now is I love it. And definitely it has pushed innovation into healthcare. It was slowly happening but to go from March to April and to see the dramatic jump into utilization of telemedicine is really important because it’s being used as a tool to connect with families; to engage patients; to continue allowing providers and physicians to continue providing the services that they (patients) need, and that is part of value-based care.”

Dr. Johanna urged physicians to answer the question:

Physicians Warming to Telehealth Telehealth - New Opportunities for Providers to Connect with Patients

“How can you think outside of the box in order to reach the population that is yours in order to prove it provides the best outcome for your patients?

And offered a reminder:

“And so the traditional model is one-to-one, in the office, with the physician. And we’re moving away from that model to having health care done in the home environment, remote monitoring, telemedicine, community health workers, other alternative sites of care – in order to complement what we call traditional medicine.”

Telehealth – New Opportunities for Providers to Connect with Patients

Dr. Jason on opportunities for telehealth: elective vs. non-elective procedures

“I think there are two different populations of providers that we need to think about:

1. Elective Procedures – Non-Emergent

Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic - Maintain Immunizations Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key

“One is the folks who perform more of the elective stuff who are not the frontline workers now. In the sense that David was talking about, the folks who traditionally may have been doing elective surgeries or other sub-specialty care where there is an opportunity to transform the way they’re delivering care. In a way, I think that’s going to be more effective because of the opportunity to accept a lot of the modalities that telehealth has pushed forward.

I’ve been trying to do telehealth 20 years ago. I was trying to push telehealth in. I saw the radiologists, the mental health, and the psychiatrist, they loved it because there’s just so much more opportunity available to them when they’re not one-on-one in a fixed location anymore. And for those folks, I think there’s an opportunity to get back to actually better outcomes; to connect with your patients in a way that you hadn’t before.

It’s kind of like Zoom. We do a lot of training and I love the chat feature because there’s this ability to interact with folks that I hadn’t thought of before. And when you’re open to that I think that, in a lot of ways, it’s going to be very healthy for healthcare providers to be able to connect to the patients.”

RELATED: Should You Go to the Doctor’s Office During Covid-19?

2. Non-Elective Procedures – Emergent

“I think on the other side though is those frontline providers that are still stuck with trying to take care of the folks that are coming through the ER or into their ICU’S; where there’s still not a lot of good information. And the struggle that they’re going to go through of trying to do the best that they can with all the uncertainty and the limitations that we have.

I think for those folks we have to be really mindful that there’s a great burden that our traditional thought about what the role of the provider is that we as a physician, I think, we have to help (our patients) see beyond and get into ‘What’s the best that you can do?’”

Healthcare Supply-Chain – Rethinking COVID-19 Impacts

The ready availability of PPE, medical equipment like ventilators, and certain pharmaceuticals was clearly called into question by the coronavirus pandemic. The lack of a $3.00 mask hampered providers’ ability to serve patients. And $30,000 ventilators are not just easily stocked without serious consideration.

Availability of Personal Protective Equipment – A Matter of Trust

Dr. Johanna shared her personal perspective from previous pandemics:

“I remember H1N1 and it was not like this. There is an element of trust as a provider, and also as a person working in the United States, that I should have not had to worry about where is my PPE coming from. It never crossed my mind in 2009 that I would not have enough PPE to protect myself against H1N1.

 And if you recall, pregnant women were high risk for H1N1. And I was pregnant, caring for pediatric patients, with my second child and I never had to think about it twice. And so now, it’s the anxiety that providers have to know that they’re having the correct equipment in order to provide the care.

 And also knowing so many of our peers are impacted by this disease and have died. It’s something that you need to pause and think about: What are we doing?”

Physician’s New Understanding & Appreciation for Supply Chains

Dr. David on physicians and their supply-chain relationship:

“The other interesting difference is that most physicians in December of last year (2019) probably couldn’t really describe a supply chain and certainly couldn’t talk to you about the strategic value of a supply chain.

 Well, after they went through the PPE shortages and pharmacy shortages, they’re now really interested in working with their healthcare stakeholders and hospital stakeholders on how to optimize supply chain activities.

 And so there’s a lot of work around nationalizing and onshoring. One of the shortages in the supply chain is the fact that countries nationalize these products, they’re not coming to North America. We’re having to work through that and that’s a big change. So with respect to payment models, we’re already seeing employers – remember there’s going to be some significant economic issues for companies/employers who are not interested in or thinking about value-based care.”

RELATED: With Excess National Supply, Exchanges Will Allow U.S. Hospitals to Continue Meeting Ventilator Demand

Part 3 Coming Soon – More COVID-19 Insight from Physician Executives

In the final post of this three-part series, highlights and details on the following topics from the informal discussion with Dr. Diloreto, Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, and Dr. Jason Woo will be shared:

  • Lessons Learned and Lessons to Be Learned
  • Experiences from Southern Hemisphere – Seasonal Viruses at All-Time Lows
  • Value of Encouraging Use of Masks
  • ‘Long Haulers’ – The Unknown, Long-Term Impact of COVID-19
  • Financial Impact on Providers, Employer Groups, & Payers
  • Employers Forced into New Reimbursement Models
  • Delayed Demand for Non-COVID Services

Live, Interactive Follow-On Chat and Q & A – October 13th

For more detailed information on the topics raised in this series of posts and for a chance to interact with and ask questions of these physician executives, join us on October 13, 2020, at 11:00 am PT/2:00 pm ET for a live, interactive follow-on chat and Q & A opportunity.

The physician panelists will provide additional insight into what’s changed, what’s remained the same, and what may be expected this fall and going into 2021. Questions and requests for additional information shared by registrants prior to and/or during the live chat will be fielded by the panelists.

Reserve your seat and submit your questions and comments today!Be sure to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn more about what’s presented in this post – and please share it with your associates. And if you are not a subscriber to our newsletter, consider joining 5000+ other healthcare leaders, change-makers, and industry participants and subscribe today!

HCEG HealthCare Executive Group 2021 Top 10Step-1-Selection-Feature-1.jpg

Healthcare Challenges, Issues, & Opportunities – The 2021 HCEG Top 10

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The HCEG Top 10 list of challenges, issues, and opportunities facing healthcare leaders have been a focus of the HealthCare Executive Group for over a decade. Planned for development by participants at our 2020 Annual Forum, the 2021 HCEG Top 10 list of challenges, issues, and opportunities facing healthcare executives guides our content and programming throughout the coming year. It also serves as the basis for the Industry Pulse research that HCEG and our sponsor partner Change Healthcare have provided over the last decade.

Given the sea change forced by the coronavirus pandemic, the upcoming presidential elections, not hosting our in-person Annual Forum this year, and feedback received about providing more detailed information – a new approach will be used to develop the HCEG Top 10 list for 2021. Four main objectives guide the development of the 2021 HCEG Top 10 list:

Address Impacts from Coronavirus Pandemic & Upcoming Elections

The COVID-19 crisis has clearly altered healthcare priorities and the outcome of the November elections will most certainly do the same. It’s important for the 2021 HCEG Top 10 list to reflect these changed priorities and likely impact from election results.

Deeper Dive into Topics of Interest to Healthcare Executives

In an effort to provide more detailed input and insight into the challenges, issues, and opportunities facing all healthcare stakeholders, candidates for the 2021 HCEG Top 10 list include over 40 ‘sub-topics’ grouped into thirteen ‘themes.” These additional details are expected to provide more value based on the type of healthcare stakeholder: health plan/payer, provider, and risk-bearing provider.

All Virtual Identification, Selection & Ranking Process

Given the absence of our in-person 2020 Annual Forum that was scheduled for this month – and keeping with HCEG’s goal of providing more granular information – the process for identifying, selecting, and ranking core items on the HCEG Top 10 will take place virtually this year.

Open to All Healthcare Industry Participants

Historically, HCEG’s Top 10 process has been limited to HCEG members and attendees of our Annual Forum. Since HCEG is not hosting a physical annual forum this year, and in an effort to collect a wider perspective from a greater number of healthcare industry participants, we’re opening the 2021 HCEG Top 10 process to everyone who cares to participate.

Overview of 2021 HCEG Top 10 Development Process

The following is the high-level process for developing the new HCEG Top 10 list:

  1. Identify “Initial List of 2021 HCEG Top 10 Themes & Sub-Topics” (COMPLETED)
  2. Solicit Feedback on Initial List from Industry at Large (9/16/20 through 11/4/20)
  3. Collect rankings of the Top 10 Sub-Topics identified in Step #2 (11/15/20 through 11/30/20)
  4. Announce 2021 HCEG Top 10 List (12/14/20)

Help Select Candidates for the 2021 HCEG Top 10

The following are the major thematic categories proposed for the 2021 HCEG Top 10. A list of the sub-topics associated with each theme can be found here.
Take Step 1 of the 2-Step 2021 HCEG Top 10 development process today.  This survey should take less than 5 minutes to complete.  If you are unable to complete the entire survey, we urge you to complete as many of the sections as possible that you consider important.

Thank you in advance for sharing your insight. Please contact us at [email protected] if you have any questions or comments. And join our newsletter to receive information, ideas, and insight for healthcare executives and change-makers: bit.ly/hcegnewsltr

Physician Perspectives on COVID-19 Impact to Fall Season

Webinar: Physician Perspectives on COVID-19 Impact to Fall Season

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In early September, the HealthCare Executive Group hosted an informal discussion with three physician executives. Long-time HCEG board member Dr. David Diloreto, MD, a board-certified ophthalmologist, ophthalmic plastic surgeon, currently a principal at Vizient/Sg2 and prior senior vice-president at GE Healthcare Camden was joined by Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, MD Senior Medical Director in Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health Plan and a practicing pediatrician at Hamilton Health Center, an FQHC in Harrisburg, PA.and Dr. Jason Woo, MD, a practicing board-certified obstetrician/gynecologist and a veteran with 31 years in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service and consultant at the Arbinger Institute.

The discussion was centered on COVID-19’s impact over the past months, what’s changed, what’s remained the same, and what they’ve each observed and learned over the past months – particularly from a clinical and public health role. The following topics were discussed:

Impact Factors Affecting Utilization of ServicesThe Change to Telehealth: New Opportunities for Providers to Connect with Patients
Balancing Treatment to Avoid Ongoing Destruction of Demand for Non-COVID ServicesRethinking the Healthcare Supply-Chain – PPE as a Matter of Trust
Returning to School & Addressing Disadvantaged PopulationsLessons Learned and Lessons to Be Learned
A Pediatric Physician on Sending Kids – Including Her Own – Back to SchoolExperiences from Southern Hemisphere – Seasonal Viruses at All-Time Lows
Impacts on Minorities & Underserved PopulationsValue of Encouraging Use of Masks
Uncertainty in Testing and Understanding Prevalence‘Long Haulers’ – The Unknown, Long-Term Impact of COVID-19
How Long Will We Be Dealing with COVID-19?Financial Impact on Providers, Employer Groups, & Payers
COVID-10 Vaccines & Importance of Fall Flu ShotsEmployers Forced into New Reimbursement Models
Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic – Maintain ImmunizationsDelayed Demand for Non-COVID Services
Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key

The information, insight, ideas, and predictions from this informal discussion are presented in a 3-part blog series and you can read Part 1 and Part 2 with Part 3 coming next week.

Live, Interactive Chat and Q & A – Physician Perspectives on COVID-19

To build on the informal discussion and to provide others with a chance to interact with and ask questions of these physicians, HCEG is hosting a special interactive event on Tuesday, October 13, 2020, at 11:00 am PT/2:00 pm ET. Questions and requests for additional information shared by registrants prior to and/or during the live chat will be fielded by the panelists.

Reserve your seat and submit your questions and comments today!

COVID-19 Insight. COVID-19 Impact to Healthcare: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season. Supply chain challenges. Telehealth virtual health services. Dealing with financial uncertainties. Coronavirus Pandemic. Back to School.

COVID-19 Insight: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season (Part 1)

By | HCEG Content, Resources | One Comment

The coronavirus pandemic has changed the world dramatically. Since late February, healthcare organizations have been largely in crisis mode – adapting to new testing and treatment demands and strategies – all while struggling to stay afloat emotionally, physically, and financially during these difficult times.

  • They’re dealing with supply chain challenges.
  • They’re adopting telehealth or accelerating their existing use of virtual health services.
  • They’re dealing with financial uncertainties due to either their focus on COVID-19 or due to the destruction of demand for non-COVID related services.
  • They’re navigating the harsh reality of a reimbursement system based on volume.

And there are many other changes caused by the pandemic and the response to the pandemic that are not yet known or fully understood.

And now, our school systems are struggling to safely re-open and bring some semblance of normality back to families and children. And as autumn rapidly approaches, addressing concerns about the potential impact from kids returning to school and the fall flu season are topics of discussion among many people.So what’s changed and what’s remained the same? What have healthcare leaders – particularly those serving in clinical and public health roles – observed and learned over the past months? What challenges, issues, and opportunities should they be focusing on? Is there a yin-yang opportunity available?

COVID-19 Insight, Information, & Ideas from Physician Leaders

To help answer these questions, the HealthCare Executive Group hosted an informal discussion with three physician executives. This post, the first in a series of three, shares some highlights and some details from that discussion.

Look for the remaining posts over the next two weeks and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter for more information on potential value to healthcare leaders and change-makers.

Listen to the entire recording here

Physician Leader Panelists

Long-time HCEG board member Dr. David Diloreto, MD, a board-certified ophthalmologist, ophthalmic plastic surgeon, currently a principal at Vizient/Sg2 and prior senior vice-president at GE Healthcare Camden was joined by Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, MD and Dr. Jason Woo, MD.

COVID-19 Impact to Healthcare: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season Panelist Biographies - Dr. David DiloretoCOVID-19 Impact to Healthcare: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season Panelist Biographies - Dr. Johanna Vidal-PhelanCOVID-19 Impact to Healthcare: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season Panelist Biographies - Dr. Jason Woo
Dr. David Diloreto, MDDr. Johanna Vidal-PhelanDr. Jason Woo, MD

Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, MD (Dr. Johanna) is Senior Medical Director in Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health Plan and a practicing pediatrician at Hamilton Health Center, an FQHC in Harrisburg, PA.

Dr. Jason Woo, MD (Dr. Jason) is a practicing board-certified obstetrician/gynecologist and a veteran with 31 years in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service. Dr. Woo is a consultant at the Arbinger Institute.

In addition, HCEG’s Executive Director Ferris Taylor helped to facilitate the discussion and provide HCEG perspectives. For more on the background and expertise of these participant leaders, see their bios here.

Live, Interactive Follow-On Chat and Q & A – October 13th

COVID-19 HealthCare Executive Group hosted an informal discussion with three physician executives.For more detailed information on the topics raised in this series of posts and for a chance to interact with and ask questions of these physicians, join us on October 13, 2020, at 11:00 am PT/2:00 pm ET for a live, interactive follow-on chat and Q & A opportunity.

The physician panelists will provide additional insight on what’s changed and what’s remained the same under COVID-19 with more on what expect this fall and going into 2021.

Questions and requests for additional information shared by registrants prior to and/or during the live chat will be fielded by the panelists. Reserve your seat and submit your questions and comments today!Be sure to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn more about what’s presented in this post – and please share it with your associates.

Discussion Kickoff

Ferris Taylor welcomed everyone, offered a short summary of the goals of the informal discussion and passed the microphone (virtually of course) to Dr. Diloreto to kick off the discussion by sharing some information and insight collected over the last six months.

Physician Executives on COVID-19 Over the Last Six Months

“Supply chain issues this spring and the PPE and pharmaceutical shortages have presented new challenges, issues, and opportunities to analytics companies; re-doing their algorithms to account for co-covered impact factors.

Results of market demand forecasting and essentially what we’re seeing is a lot of what we have been virtual health. we’ve been we’ve probably compressed the trend for adoption of virtual health by five to seven years and now people are figuring out well that was bootstrapping and video conferencing with families but how do we really get the provider workflows adjusted so that this is meaningful and a productive way to deliver care.”Physician Executives on COVID-19 Over the Last Six Months

Impact Factors Affecting Utilization of Services

“The other thing we’re looking at that’s interesting is how the impact factors are affecting utilization of services. Early on we saw folks just avoiding the emergency room even staying home with symptoms of stroke and myocardial infarction. The high acuity services have returned but low acuity services have not, and we don’t believe they ever will.

These are things that basically probably shouldn’t have been in the emergency room to start with and folks are finding ways to deal with it. High acuity conditions like TAVR (Transcutaneous Aortic Valve Replacement) procedures and neurosurgical procedures are actually coming back really strong. People almost at full comparing the first six months of 2019 the first six months of 2020 basically the same utilization rates.

What’s interesting are more elective procedures including things like PE tubes in children – which have only come back to about 40 %. And so one of the issues there is could be a combination of factors. In the social distancing that was happening in the spring maybe there was less UTI and eye infections. On the other hand, families that we know are avoiding preventive services. There may be children with chronic ear infections not getting detected now. There are things that may play out long term that we have to figure out. So there’s a variable return of on the provider side of certain services.”

Dr. David went on to share more about:

Balancing Treatment to Avoid Ongoing Destruction of Demand for Non-COVID Services

COVID-19 Non-COVID Elective Services

  1. They have to balance the treatment of COVID positive patients and non-COVID positive patients in the pandemic. And we watch those surges in places like Tampa and Los Angeles and Houston last month. And actually the provider community is getting a lot better at being able to balance that care. We know more about early intervention with certain treatments. There’s less folks going on onto ventilators and obviously we’re protecting the most vulnerable people in the elderly and institutions much better. 
  1. On the other hand, the impacts financially both from demand destruction as well as increased costs are huge. We’re seeing provider groups, hospitals and health systems really having to deal now with not only the near-term financial recovery but also some very significant economic issues. We’re looking at unemployment rates in Florida right now and in Orlando where there’s high rates of people employed in tourism and entry-level service jobs unemployment rate of about 20%.

Returning to School & Addressing Disadvantaged Populations

  1. Should I send my children to school? What should I look for? Am I at risk? How will they (children) interact with aunts and uncles and grandparents? Is it really safe? And if they don’t go to school, what does that mean? 
  1. The impact in disadvantaged communities has been huge and it plays out in interesting ways not just in urban centers but was really interesting as we watched the surges in Los Angeles, Tampa and Houston as they came down the nearby rural areas particularly where you had either migrant workers and low-income workers in fields they were getting infected at very high rates. That’s probably sort of the fits and starts with this that we’re going to have throughout this pandemic until there’s widespread use of vaccines, herd immunity and more effective therapies

A Pediatrician on Sending Kids – Including Her Own – Back to School

HCEG Three Physicians on COVID-19 A Pediatrician on Sending Kids – Including Her Own - Back to School

Dr. Johanna was asked: What are you advising your patients on when they ask you: “Is it safe to send someone to school? As both a Practicing pediatrician and a parent of two school aged children, Johanna shared:

“So that’s a very important question and each family will have a different solution. I think that the first thing I have to tell parents and including myself as a parent is to empower the parent to make the decision. And there’s no wrong or right decision. You need to do what’s right for your family. And so, in partnership with the school district where your children are, I’m going to think about different things that had happened in the last 10 years for families and children. This has been one of those aspects that had created a lot of anxiety for families including myself. And I think a topic of importance to discuss is in regard to the home environment. 

Most of the kids in the state of Pennsylvania are not having the opportunity to return to school full-time – so not five days. They’re doing a hybrid model or fully online. What is the impact for a working family that has to figure out how to come up with new solutions in regard to the care of the children during the days that they are not in school?”

Impacts to Minorities & Underserved Populations

“And the financial hardship that that may represent to a family. I’ve seen families make very challenging decisions where one of the parents is no longer working. So that parent can help with the children in the home environment for schooling. And other families are sending their children though they don’t want to, or they don’t feel comfortable because they have to go to work. I’ve seen a really dramatic impact in Latinos and minorities. As you know, Latino families/minorities families are mainly in the service industry – many of us. So what happens is that the level of exposure to COVID-19 is higher – disproportionately impacting African Americans and Latinos. 

So you think about families and the impact in children and what that means to them is significant. It is a very challenging question. Parents ask me all the time in the pediatric practice and I respond with the answer: What is it that is important to you as a family? What is it that you can provide or not for your children education? And then we have a frank discussion about what the family will need to do.”HCEG Uncertainty in COVID-19 Testing and Understanding Prevalence

Uncertainty in Testing & Understanding Prevalence

Dr. Jason followed on with:

“I think, coming from the public health perspective particularly the FDA background, there’s just so much uncertainty in the testing and understanding incidents prevalence and what the outcome of an infection is. It’s so critical to be non-judgmental of what – as you pointed out Johanna – each family has to figure out what’s best for them. 

As we’re providing services, part of the challenge is to be aware of the individuality that has to be accounted for each of the patients or each of the patients coming or families coming into the healthcare system and trying to figure out what’s right for them.”

A Perfect Petri “Diamond Princess” Dish – Wasted

“I think the one thing I kicked myself is, at the beginning of all this, I was so certain that we would have such good data from the date of the Diamond Princess. There were 3000 patients, they’ve been isolated, they’re dropping CDC resources in there, they’re doing sampling and we’re going to have so much information. And then after two weeks and nothing’s coming out. I had completely missed out. 

We talk about the public health system being underfunded but I never expected us to be so poorly informed in terms of the data of the natural course of the infection, of infectivity, of how quickly it spreads and how it spreads. And so now with the plethora of different testing and the different way things are being approved by the FDA, I think it’s challenging because it’s just not the kind of data or standards that we would have had when we did Ebola, when we did Zika. 

I wouldn’t say it’s for lack of knowing how to deal (with it), it’s just the challenge of not having a sort of a standard upfront approach prepared to go up front. And I don’t say politics. I don’t want to point fingers at all in this.”

RELATED: Leadership, Trust & Skills in Overcoming Obstacles to Radical Innovation in Healthcare

How Long Will We Be Dealing with COVID-19?

Ferris mentioned reading about a poll asking physicians when physicians are expecting to be “on top of or ahead of COVID-19.” Ferris related that 50% of physician respondents are expecting that we won’t be on top or ahead of COVID until June of 2021.How Long Will We Be Dealing with COVID-19?

Dr. David shared some other insight from his organization:

“Our projections are that we’ll be dealing with a pandemic situation probably into the fourth quarter of next year (2021) simply because the production and distribution of effective vaccines – and of course the early trials are encouraging – but it’s still a monumental undertaking. And also, we still don’t know the issues about long-term effectiveness (of any vaccine). There’s still a lot of volatility around that.” 

“It seems like 2020 has been a decade. We’re finally in August and so in addition to dealing with an ongoing pandemic, we’ll have seasonal viruses and seasonal respiratory infections starting to come into play. Tell us a little bit about how you think it’ll affect frontline practices particularly with respect to testing strategies and recommendations for families.”

Dr. Jason countered:

“The question is: what do states do at this point in terms of making requirements that some of the school-age kids must meet to even participate? 

I think New York already came out with the mandatory testing; I think California also as well. There’s certainly been a lot of confusion. There are factors that – as you point out – variables that if kids aren’t in school how does that affect exposure rates that we’re not going to project the uncertainty as a provider. I think that you’re presented with where folks are coming in is certainly so dependent upon where our testing capabilities are. And how much better knowledge we have. And how quickly folks can respond to that. And that’s why it’s very difficult. 

It gets back to the uncertainty of how quickly these conditions continue to evolve and to what extent we’re able to get better information. There seems to be a lot of people working very hard at it but there’s just so much variation in the testing and so I think it’s going to be particularly hard for providers to make that (decision) but there’s just still a lot of uncertainty about what those actual prevalence rates are going to be with the different conditions. 

I’d also ask, if kids aren’t in school, how does that affect the general trend of seasonal viruses?”COVID-19 Insight. COVID-19 Impact to Healthcare: Physician Perspectives on the Fall Season. Supply chain challenges. Telehealth virtual health services. Dealing with financial uncertainties. Coronavirus Pandemic. Back to School.

Part 2 Coming Soon – More COVID-19 Insight from Physician Executives

In the next post of this three-part series, highlights and details on the following topics from the informal discussion with Dr. Diloreto, Dr. Johanna Vidal-Phelan, and Dr. Jason Woo will be shared:

  • COVID-10 Vaccines & Importance of Fall Flu Shots
  • Avoiding Other Illnesses or a Different Pandemic – Maintain Immunizations
  • Vaccinations for Underserved Populations – Messaging is Key
  • The Change to Telehealth: New Opportunities for Providers to Connect with Patients
  • Rethinking the Healthcare Supply-Chain – PPE as a Matter of Trust

Live, Interactive Follow-On Chat and Q & A – October 13th

For more detailed information on the topics raised in this series of posts and for a chance to interact with and ask questions of these physician executives, join us on October 13, 2020, at 11:00 am PT/2:00 pm ET for a live, interactive follow-on chat and Q & A opportunity.

The physician panelists will provide additional insight on what’s changed, what’s remained the same, and what may be expected this fall and going into 2021. Questions and requests for additional information shared by registrants prior to and/or during the live chat will be fielded by the panelists.

Reserve your seat and submit your questions and comments today!Be sure to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn more about what’s presented in this post – and please share it with your associates. And if you are not a subscriber to our newsletter, consider joining 5000+ other healthcare leaders, change-makers, and industry participants and subscribe today!

Spotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge Health

Spotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge Health

By | Sponsor | 2 Comments

Employers and health plans interested in truly solving their musculoskeletal (MSK) issues must assemble a collection of disconnected vendors such as prevention/wellness, tele-PT, digital programs, expert medical opinion, centers of excellence (COEs) – resulting in a fragmented member care experience.

To address these failures in the continuum of MSK care, our most recent sponsor, Hinge Health, is pioneering the world’s most patient-centered Digital Clinic for back & joint pain. By expanding their clinical capabilities to provide an end-to-end Digital MSK Clinic, Hinge Health meets members along the MSK continuum of care from prevention to post-surgery.

RELATED: The World’s First Digital Clinic for Back and Joint Pain

Hinge Health’s Clinical Care Model Delivers Industry’s Best Engagement & Outcomes

Hinge Health’s virtual clinical care model

Through its use of virtual physical therapy, behavioral health coaching, and digital sensor technology, Hinge Health’s virtual clinical care model delivers the industry’s best engagement and outcomes. The clinical expertise of our physical therapists paired with the motivational and behavioral training of our health coaches results in the industry’s highest adherence rate with a participant completion rate 3x the industry average.

Hinge Health’s solution addresses several key items on the 2020 HCEG Top 10 including Costs & Transparency (#1), Consumer Experience (#2), Holistic Individual Health (#6), and Accessible Points of Care (#8). As patients avoid doctor and hospital visits during COVID-19, Hinge Health’s at-home digital MSK care provides a more holistic and accessible approach to care resulting in better outcomes at a lower cost.

RELATED: Overcoming Chronic Pain: Hinge Health’s Clinical Model of Care

Musculoskeletal Outcomes Validated by Stanford, UCSF & Vanderbilt

With all the hype around digital health, many employers and health plans might be wondering: Do digital health solutions actually solve chronic back or joint pain and reduce medical spend? MSK issues are the number one cost driver for medical spend—outpacing other conditions such as diabetes and cancer.  However, in the world’s largest digital MSK study, researchers from Stanford, University of California San Francisco, and Vanderbilt University, demonstrated that Hinge Health’s digital MSK solution directly results in better outcomes at lower spend.

With over 10,000 participants, the longitudinal cohort study revealed that Hinge Health resulted in:Spotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge Health. revention/wellness, tele-PT, digital programs, expert medical opinion, centers of excellence (COEs)

  • 69% average pain reduction–that’s 4x more pain reduction compared to opioids
  • 58% average reduction in depression & anxiety
  • 3 in 4 participants completed the program, making it the industry’s highest 12- week adherence rate
  • $5,012 medical claims savings per participant per year

RELATED: Cutting Through the Hype: Does Digital Health Actually Work?

Partnering with Employers & Health Plans

With nearly 200 enterprise customers, Hinge Health partners with employers and health plans to address member MSK pain and reduce high medical costs. With Hinge Health’s fast and easy implementation process, customers can deliver at-home digital care to help resolve members’ chronic back and joint pain.

See 6 Reasons Hinge Health Offers a Record 4-Week Turnkey Implementation for more information.

Customer Testimonials on Value of Musculoskeletal Program

Having nearly quadrupled their customer base in 12 months, Hinge Health is privileged to be the choice of 4 in 5 employers with a digital MSK solution including Boeing, AutoZone, US Foods, Southern Company, Walgreens, PwC, FujiFilm, and more.

Employee EngagementSingle, Coordinated ProgramEvidence-Based Design
Hinge Health musculoskeletal platform programs. MSK. wellness, prevention, tele-rehabilitation, digital applications, expert clinical opinion, best practice guidelines. Digital Care Pathways. Exercise Therapy. Behavioral Support & Coaching. Education. Wearables, Health Coaching. Costs & Transparency. Consumer Experience. Holistic Individual Health. Accessible Points of CareSpotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge HealthSpotlight on Musculoskeletal (MSK) Programs – Hinge Health

Additional Information on Hinge Health’s Musculoskeletal Platform

Check out the Hinge Health website, the Hinge Health blog, and the following information on how musculoskeletal solutions can help improve outcomes, lower costs, and improve member engagement.

Engage with Hinge Health

For more information and to discuss how our sponsor partner Hinge Health can provide the best care for your employer or health plan members, contact Hinge Health today.

(855) 902-2777

[email protected]

[email protected]

“The Silver Lining of COVID-19: Accelerate Innovation on the Road to Transformation”

A Silver Lining to COVID-19? Join Our Partners’ Virtual Events

By | Partners | No Comments

As we have all heard many times, “necessity is the mother of invention.“ Healthcare is facing what may be the crisis of the century and suddenly our slow-to-change industry is seeing radical change, some forced and others invented, never imagined even just a few months ago.

Many healthcare changemakers are aware that:

  • The use of telehealth and virtual care has exploded in the last month
  • Patient-specific risk scores and analytics are being used to bolster and guide virtual outreach, ventilation management, and patient care
  • Remote technologies can protect consumers, providers and health care workers from exposure and limit personal protection equipment (PPE) utilization

Could this forced acceleration of innovation be the “silver lining of COVID-19?”

Don’t Just Survive – Plan to Thrive on the Other Side of COVID-19

If you’ve just been trying to survive the surge in your ICU or across your health system, join us on Tuesday, May 5th at 2:00 pm ET for “The Silver Lining of COVID-19: Accelerate Innovation on the Road to Transformation.” This webinar hosted by our partner World Health Care Congress and sponsored by Medical Informatics Corp will be moderated by our Executive Director Ferris Taylor.

Bring your questions to this online, interactive online event and hear advice from experts as to specific actions you can take to survive these fast-changing times and what healthcare might look like on the other side of COVID-19.  Helpful insights for everyone in healthcare will be shared.

Learn More and Register for this Complimentary Webinar HereWHCC World Health Care Congress Webinar

Learn from Government & Private ChangeMakers on the Front Line

Everyone paying attention to news reports and the unfortunate statistics conveying COVID-19’s impact can imagine the importance that governmental policy, interoperability rules, practical information exchange capabilities between payers, providers, and patient can have on defining, implementing, strengthening, and sustaining all stakeholders through the COVID-19 pandemic – equitably, reasonably and sustainably.

WEDI 2020 Virtual

The importance of effective health information exchange has never been greater. To learn more from public and private leaders and changemakers on the frontline about the above topics, consider attending WEDI’s 2020 Virtual Forum on Monday 5/4, Wednesday 5/6, & Thursday 5/7 of this week.

Sessions on current data exchange-related roadblocks, practical aspects of the new ONC interoperability rules, and Federal Telehealth Policy Actions in Response to COVID-19, among other timely topics, will be presented.

See the Agenda and Register HereWEDI 2020 Virtual data exchange-related roadblocks, practical aspects of new ONC interoperability rules, and Federal Telehealth Policy Actions in Response to COVID19

RELATED: COVID-19 Resources for Health Plans, Health Systems, & Medical Service Providers

Bringing It All Together to Focus on the Individual Healthcare Consumer

Equally important to learning how public and private organizations are addressing COVID-19 imperatives, it’s important that healthcare organizations use a flexible, scalable approach to messaging consumers and employers.

Messages and communications need to be relevant and delivered quickly so that individuals – and managed groups – stay informed; and more likely to take the most appropriate actions.  As the COVID-19 pandemic drives more individuals to become more engaged in their health and the care they may need – or want, innovative healthcare organizations have an opportunity to differentiate their brands and build trust by delivering customer experiences that exceed everyone’s expectations, even during a crisis.

RELATED: Connecting the Dots: COVID-19, HCEG Top 10, & Industry Pulse

Breaking Through the Barriers to Better Consumer ExperienceHCEG May 2020 Webinar Series event presented by our sponsor partner Zipari

Join the HCEG May 2020 Webinar Series event presented by our sponsor partner Zipari on Thursday, May 21st, 2020 11:00 am PT / 2:00 pm ET

This webinar will present a Consumer Experience (CX) framework for healthcare organizations to prioritize and manage consumer goals and messaging during COVID-19 via consumer experience technology. Actionable information and ideas on streamlining outreach to specific individuals prioritized across-departmental objectives will be presented.

Learn More and Register for this Complimentary Webinar Here

HIMSS20 & Other Conferences Go Virtual – Insight & Information

By | Events, Partners | No Comments

The historic cancellation of the 2020 HIMSS Conference & Exhibition has impacted the way healthcare leaders and change-makers obtain information, exchange ideas, and network with others. In the last two weeks, many conferences have canceled or are canceling their physical events and are ‘going virtual’ to salvage the content and speakers they had lined up for their events. Other conference organizers are scrambling to figure out how to support their attendees and exhibitors going forward. Indeed, the conference and media industry – healthcare or otherwise – are mapping and paying the digital freight to help ensure their future.

Here’s some information on the virtual events and content the HealthCare Executive Group, our sponsors, partners, and associates are sharing to make the best of the cancellations of major healthcare conferences like the 2020 HIMSS Conference & Exhibition. And a bit of history on how HCEG provides a year-round approach to supporting the information and networking needs of healthcare executives and change-makers.

HIMSS 20 Cancellation – Collaborating Virtually

Almost immediately after HIMSS Leadership announced the cancellation of the 2020 HIMSS Conference & Exhibition, a slew of announcements about virtual events and content sharing were made by various speakers, attendees, exhibitors, and others involved in the HIMSS20 conference. This cancellation was the first time in nearly 60 years that the HIMSS Conference was canceled. And no one: attendees, speakers, panelists, sponsors, exhibitors, and/or those hired to produce the 2020 HIMSS Conference & Exhibition have NOT been impacted in one way or another by this cancellation.

And shortly after HIMSS announced the cancellation of their annual conference, they announced that the HIMSS 2020 Global Health Conference & Exhibition is Going Digital.

RELATED: HIMSS CEO: Cancelling Conference was ‘heartbreaking’, But HIMSS20 Digital is Set for Growth

Information and Insight About the Future of Healthcare Conferences – Go Virtual

The comfort of meeting and exchanging ideas and information with each other at in-person events has changed. There’s no denying this fact. People are going to have to get comfortable with sharing information, making acquaintances, and networking with others in new, largely unknown and somewhat difficult to use, channels and platforms. Thankfully, the HealthCare Executive Group has decades of experience facilitating interaction between healthcare executives and the companies that support their mission.

In addition to our Annual Forum and quarterly Executive Leadership Roundtables, HCEG presents webinars, online discussion, podcasts and blog posts such as this post.

HCEG has also established both formal and informal partnerships with complementary organizations that also serve our members and other healthcare industry participants associates. These partnerships extend and complement the content, networking opportunities, and value offered by HCEG and its partners. For 2020, these partnerships include being a HIMSS Collaboration Partner and AHIP Educational Partner.

RELATED: The HealthCare Executive Group: Supporting & Convening Leaders & Change Makers in 2020 & Beyond

HCEG Sponsor Partners – Conferences Go Virtual

HCEG sponsors scheduled to present in Orlando have stepped up and performed the work to share most of their scheduled presentations. We urge you to check out these virtual shares – webinars, recordings, blog  posts, and other information – from our sponsor partners:

Change Healthcare:

Our longtime sponsor Change Healthcare has prepared videos, graphics, blog posts and more to share information intended for HIMSS20 attendees.

See the Virtual On-Demand HIMSS20 Experience from Change Healthcare here.

Surescripts:

Webinar recordings, blog posts and other digital content intended to help HIMSS20 attendees understand how Cost & Transparency and the Consumer Experience are key to improving healthcare outcomes are shared here by Surescripts and in the following downloads.

Executive Director Ferris Taylor shares thoughts on HIMSS20 cancellation and how HCEG is participating in #virtualHIMSS20 in this podcast from @healthcare_pod

Other HIMSS20 Participants – Go Virtual

Over the last week, dozens, if not 100’s, of virtual presentations and digital artifacts have been shared to help ameliorate the cancellation of the 2020 HIMSS Conference. Here are some of those digital shares of potential value:

Decision Insights Emerging Patterns 2018-2020

Compliance Trends and Frameworks for the Healthcare Industry

Virtual HIMSS – Consumerism & Patient Engagement Pavilion

The Near Future of Virtual & Intimate In-Person Events

Over the last week, since the 2020 HIMSS Conference has been canceled, a number of worldwide organizations, companies, and individuals have shared valuable insight into what may turn out to be the future of long-standing ‘initiatives’

Here are a few considerations:

  • How will healthcare leaders and change-makers obtain the leads they’ll lose from Cancelled Conferences and Events?
  • How will the current organizer dominatrix move forward over the next 12-24 months?
  • How will the organizer bring their conference or event online?

Here are some ideas for ‘Going Virtual:’

10 steps for scrappy marketers to survive the #HIMSS20 cancellation

Amid Coronavirus Fears, Startups Rethink the Virtual Conference

Best Practices: Hosting Events In The Age Of #Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Key planning recommendations for Mass Gatherings in the context of the current COVID-19 outbreak

What it takes to run a great virtual meeting

Connect with HealthCare Executive Group All Year-Round

Consider the following if you’d like to learn more about the healthcare delivery system transformation and connect with other healthcare leaders and changemakers.

Insight from Healthcare Leaders & Change Makers – 2020 Industry Pulse. HCEG HealthCare Executive Group. Top 10. Digital Health. Health Tech. 2020 Industry Pulse Report Consumer-centric strategy. Sdoh. Value-based-care. In-Network vs. Out-of-Network Providers.

Insight from Healthcare Leaders & Change Makers – The 2020 Industry Pulse Report

By | HCEG Content, Research | No Comments

We’re pleased to announce the release of the 2020 Industry Pulse Report! This annual survey commissioned by the HealthCare Executive Group and Change Healthcare takes the pulse of a broad spectrum of healthcare industry leaders representing payers, providers (hospitals, doctors offices, & integrated delivery networks) and other industry participants from across the nation.

The 2020 Industry Pulse Report is based on the 2020 HCEG Top 10 list of challenges, issues, and opportunities facing healthcare executives and change-makers. In its 10th year of production, the survey drew a record number of respondents (445), 80% of who held titles of director level or above shared their responses and comments on survey questions, 25% of those participants were from the C-Suite.

Results of the initial analysis of survey data were announced earlier this month and can be accessed here.  Look for the release of additional insight based on the 2020 Industry Pulse Report and the 2020 HCEG Top 10 including webinars, podcasts, conference presentations and additional article posts over the coming weeks and months leading up to HCEG’s Annual Forum in September.HCEG HealthCare Executive Group. Top 10. Digital Health. Health Tech. 2020 Industry Pulse Report

RELATED: 2020 HCEG Top 10 List – Preliminary Insight & Overview of What’s to Come

Consumer Experience + Value-Based Care = Consumer Centricity

The 2020 Industry Pulse Report provides deeper insight into the topics of healthcare cost and outcomes transparency, the healthcare consumer experience, and adopting next-generation payment models like value-based care. The information and analysis contained in the report help to understand current progress being made by providers and payers on the topics identified as most important by healthcare leaders. The survey was designed to elicit and share information on some of the methods being used, priorities, and areas of alignment and disagreement between the primary survey respondents: providers and payers.

See ‘Additional Areas of Insight’ below for other HCEG Top 10-related items addressed in the 2020 Industry Pulse Report.

Consumer-Centric Strategy Varies Between Payers & Providers

In terms of existence and maturity of a Consumer-Centric Strategy, there were areas of alignment – and disagreement – between the largest two groups of survey participants: providers and payers. These data are presented across a 4-point continuum of Consumer-Centric Strategy:HCEG HealthCare Executive Group. Top 10. Digital Health. Health Tech. 2020 Industry Pulse Report Consumer-centric strategy. Sdoh. Value-based-care.

  1. No Consumer-Centric Strategy
  2. Nascent Consumer-Centric Strategy:  single-point solutions, but no unifying organization-wide approach
  3. Intermediate Consumer-Centric Strategy: a consumer-centric approach, actively investing in technologies but no company-wide impact
  4. Full Consumer-Centric Strategy: fully implemented tools and technologies to achieve consumer-centric outcomes and able to effectively measure improvements

Areas of alignment – and disagreement – between the survey’s two largest respondent groups Providers (hospitals, doctors offices, & integrated delivery networks) and Payers (health plans) presented overall responses from these core survey participant groups across a 4-point continuum of Consumer-Centric Strategy.

Disagreement on Current State of Healthcare Consumer Centricity

It’s no surprise there’s disagreement regarding the responsibility, readiness, and challenges facing providers and payers in their transformation to address consumer-centricity. The report reveals both providers and payers are split in the area of value-based care – perhaps the most common Next Generation Payment Model:

  • Payers are much more likely to have robust consumer-centric strategies and providers are much more likely to have no consumer-centric strategy at all.
  • Payers and providers disagree on who’s best positioned to provide cost and quality data to consumers.
  • Payers are much more likely to have migrated to value-based care models while providers are still predominantly offering fee-for-service models.

RELATED: 2020 Industry Pulse Report: Alignments and AsymmetriesPhysicians Practice

Who’s Best Positioned to Support Consumer Healthcare Journey?

Regardless of role, most respondents think payers (31%) are best positioned to provide cost and quality data to healthcare consumers.  Some survey respondents noted others: “Health Information Networks”, “Insurance Agents”, and “Government Agencies.”

However, most respondents favor providers nearly 3 to 1 as being best positioned to support the consumer on their healthcare journey. Some respondents shared that “Retailers and innovators,” “Case Managers,” and “Friends and Family” are best positioned to support individuals on their healthcare journey.

Financial Improvements to Positively Impact Consumer Satisfaction

Survey participants ranked a series of financial or billing improvements based on how they perceived those improvements as improving customer satisfaction. Turns out, addressing the basics that consumers have come to expect are perceived as driving the most value.Surprise billing. HCEG HealthCare Executive Group. Top 10. Digital Health. Health Tech. 2020 Industry Pulse Report Consumer-centric strategy. Sdoh. Value-based-care. In-Network vs. Out-of-Network Providers.

  • Clear Identification of In-Network vs. Out-of-Network Providers
  • Consolidated Billing from Multiple Providers
  • Elimination of Surprise Billing
  • Online Payment Capabilities
  • Plain-Language EOBs and Simplified Invoicing
  • Real-Time Point-of-Service Billing
  • Simplified Benefit Explanations/Navigation
  • Simplified/Flexible Payment Options

Participants were also asked to rank other non-clinical improvements based on their potential to positively impact consumer satisfaction.

Additional Areas of Insight – 2020 Industry Pulse Report

Beyond the topics noted above, the 2020 Industry Pulse Report includes insight into the following challenges, issues, and opportunities facing healthcare organizations.

  • Barriers to Adopting Value-Based Care
    • Payers cite lack of or limited IT infrastructure as an impediment to value-based care while providers cite unclear or conflicting performance measures and regulatory changes/political uncertainty
  • How They’re Addressing Social Determinants of Health (SDOH)
    • Payers and providers differ on the type of sdoh-related data they are capturing
  • Effectiveness of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
    • Providers are significantly more likely than payers to state Health System Efficiency has been positively impacted by AI and machine-learning
    • Payers are significantly more likely to say Reducing Costs has been positively impacted.
  • Drivers of Demand for Interoperability
    • Payers view Regulatory Changes as driving interoperability while Providers rank Physician-Driven Initiatives as a driver of the demand for interoperability
  • Top Reasons for Continued Cybersecurity Breaches
    • Across all C-Suite respondents, nearly 25% believe that Cybersecurity is not Recognized as a Priority at the Executive/Board Level.

Information on methods used, areas of alignment, respective priority, and disagreement between various supply-side stakeholders on the above areas can be of unique value to payers, hospitals, doctors’ offices, and integrated delivery networks.

Get Your Copy of the 2020 Industry Pulse Report

Download the 2020 Industry Pulse Report for more details on the above and other insights collected by the 2020 Industry Pulse Report. And look for more analysis and commentary on the Industry Pulse survey from HCEG, our sponsor partners and media covering the healthcare industry.

If you have any questions you have about the 2020 Industry Pulse Report, the 2020 HCEG Top 10, or the HealthCare Executive Group, please feel free to email us.

WEBINAR: “Industry Pulse Check: How Providers and Payers See 2020 Healthcare Trends

More Insight for Healthcare Leaders and Change Makers

The 2020 Industry Pulse Report and the HCEG Top 10 list of challenges, issues, and opportunities demand change and innovation from all stakeholders – particularly within the ongoing uncertainty of U. S. healthcare reform and an election year. Consider the following if you’d like to dive deeper into these topics and connect with other healthcare leaders and change-makers.

Please consider sharing your insight, experiences, and opinion as your perspective will help define the issues facing healthcare and reveal how key industry participants are acting to transform the healthcare delivery system.

Recent 3rd-Party Analysis and Coverage of the 2020 Industry Pulse Report

10th Annual Industry Pulse. HCEG Top 10. HealthCare Executive Group.

Announcing the 10th Annual Industry Pulse Survey of Healthcare Leaders

By | HCEG Top 10, Research, Sponsor | One Comment

The 10th Annual Industry Pulse research survey opens today!

And healthcare industry leaders are encouraged to share their take on the challenges, issues, and opportunities they’re facing in 2020 and beyond. Based on the 2020 HCEG Top 10 list and conducted jointly by the HealthCare Executive Group and Change Healthcare, the survey is intended to flesh out and explore what leaders of healthcare organizations may be facing in the immediate future. Everyone reading this post are encouraged to complete the survey and share it with their co-workers and associates. Just taking this survey will provide respondents with thought-provoking questions and offer ideas they may otherwise not be aware of.

2020 HCEG Top 10 as Basis for 10th Annual Industry Pulse Survey

This 10th annual instance of the Industry Pulse collects additional insight, experiences, and opinions on specific items of the 2020 HCEG Top 10 list developed in September 2019 at HCEG’s 31st Annual Forum. The questions, possible responses, and results of the Industry Pulse can provide valuable, relevant data-driven advice and end-to-end industry insights to help healthcare leaders navigate the complexities of our rapidly evolving healthcare system.

Share your Insight Today!

HCEG and Change Healthcare would like to invite healthcare leaders from across the nation to participate in this year’s Industry Pulse research survey and to compare and contrast their own perspectives against the 2020 HCEG Top 10.Please consider sharing your insight, experiences, and opinion as your perspective will help define the issues facing healthcare, and reveal how the industry is responding.  Everyone who completes the 10th Annual Industry Pulse Survey will be among the first to receive survey results as well as exclusive access to future webinars, content, and events that will be delivered over the new year; expounding on survey results and providing additional insight and value to all healthcare constituents.

RELATED: The 9th Annual Industry Pulse Survey

2019 Industry Pulse Survey value-based payment Value-Based Relationships & Reimbursement:

Value-Based Relationships & Reimbursement: How can Industry Collaborate to Speed the Move to Value?

By | Events, HCEG Top 10 | No Comments

Value-based Payment (and Value-based Care Reform) has ranked among HCEG’s Top 10 list of challenges, issues, and opportunities each of the last 10 years that HCEG’s Top 10 list has been published; a clear indication healthcare leaders realize that the move to payment for outcomes (value) vs. volume (FFS) is inevitable. It’s clear that value-based relationships & reimbursement is important to health plans, health systems and provider organizations. But year after year, shared-risk, value-based healthcare appears to be just around the corner. Why so slow? How can healthcare leaders championing the transformation of America’s healthcare system finally begin to realize the value of value-based payment?

In fact, the majority of respondents to the 2019 Industry Pulse Research Survey indicate that value-based relationships including both upside and downside shared risk still appears to be three to five years off.2019 Industry Pulse Survey value-based payment

If what’s apparently widely thought, then why is the move by health plans, health systems, and healthcare providers to value-based reimbursement perpetually stuck at being three to five years away from adopting shared-risk value-based contracts?

Join Us at Hotel Commonwealth for our Complimentary Executive Leadership Roundtable – Breakfast is Included

Healthcare Innovation and Disruption, HealthCare Executive Group, HCEG, 16th Annual World Health Care Congress (WHCC), CIO & CTO Strategy Track, innovation, disruption. healthcare champions, Data Analytics, Pharmacy Costs and Transparency, Importance of Useable Technology, Cybersecurity, HCEG Top 10, Center for Healthcare Innovation (CHI), International Association of Innovation Professionals,Speeding the Move to Value-Based Relationships & Reimbursement

On Wednesday, September 11th, the HealthCare Executive Group is presenting a special Executive Leadership Roundtable as part of their 31st Annual Forum. This interactive roundtable event open to everyone who’s in Boston on September 11th – there’s no charge to join other healthcare leaders from across the country to learn about value-based care and meet others facing similar challenges. To be clear, this special ELR event is open to everyone.

Participants of this special ELR will benefit from:

  • Interactive discussion between attendees and speakers on what the movement to value means
  • Learning about the top challenges and opportunities in transitioning from payment for volume
  • Why healthcare organizations are hesitant to provide value-based care and thoughts on overcoming them
  • Understanding realistic next steps healthcare leaders can take to make real progress in the move to value
  • Recent successes in new payment models and lessons-learned
  • A look at cross-industry partnerships in the movement to value-based care reimbursement

This will be a rare opportunity for Healthcare Champions who gather in Boston on September 11th to learn more about value-based payment and care opportunities and to interact with speakers and other participants on a meaningful basis.

The $64,000 Question (Or the $64B+ Question?) – Always 3 to 5 Years Away

Why is the move by health plans, health systems, and healthcare providers to value-based reimbursement perpetually stuck at being three to five years away from adopting shared-risk value-based contracts?

To learn how to advance value-based care, join us at the Hotel Commonwealth for our September Executive Leadership Roundtable event -Value-Based Relationships & Reimbursement: How can Industry Collaborate to Speed the Move to Value? -and learn from the following session leaders and ELR participants:

Panelists Sharing Insight on Value-Based Relationships & Reimbursement

Moderator: David Di Loreto, MD – Principle – Sg2

Panelists:

Join Others to Learn About Value-based Care in Boston on September 11, 2019

Be a part of this unique, no-cost learning and networking opportunity on the last day of the HealthCare Executive Group’s 31st Annual Forum. Breakfast is included and registration is required.

Healthcare Innovation and Disruption, HealthCare Executive Group, HCEG, 16th Annual World Health Care Congress (WHCC), CIO & CTO Strategy Track, innovation, disruption. healthcare champions, Data Analytics, Pharmacy Costs and Transparency, Importance of Useable Technology, Cybersecurity, HCEG Top 10, Center for Healthcare Innovation (CHI), International Association of Innovation Professionals,